MARY'S GENEALOGY TREASURES
Home     Email     Canada     Databases     England     Ethnic/Religious    FamilySearch.org    Ireland/No.Ireland  
L.D.S. Websites     Research Helps     Scotland     United States     Wales     World Databases 

The Blacksmith Shops - Seven Persons

Seven Persons - Once Hundred Sixty Acres and a Dream

Chapter 28

Blacksmith shops were busy places, at one time, in this village. The practice of welding was unknown then, so iron was heated in a forge by a special hot-burning coal, enlivened by a hand-turned fan, until red hot, and then pounded into shape or into union with another piece of equally hot iron. In this way iron articles were created or mended.

Plow shares were sharpened by being heated and then pounded to a sharp edge. Wagon wheels and buggy wheels were repaired by heating the iron rim and making it fit a more shrunken wooden wheel. Horses were shod with iron shoes and these had to be heated and shaped for each hoof. Children liked to watch the shower of sparks as the blacksmith hammered the red-hot pieces of iron. They liked the clanging sounds.

Blacksmiths, who worked in Seven Persons, were: Mr. Bowman, Mr. Schwartz, Mr. Nelson, Roy Spooner and Johnny Meyer.

Return Seven Persons
Return AB Cities, Towns, Villiages
Home     Email     Canada     Databases     England     Ethnic/Religious    FamilySearch.org    Ireland/No.Ireland  
L.D.S. Websites     Research Helps     Scotland     United States     Wales     World Databases 

Copyright 2000
Mary Tollestrup