MARY'S GENEALOGY TREASURES
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Truman Wilford Bone and
Mary Jane (Buhler) Bone

Pinepound Reflections - A History of
Spring Coulee and District pages 222 - 223
by George Bone

Truman Wilford Bone the eldest son of George Joseph Bone and Mary Miranda (Fowler) Bone, was born in Lehi Utah in 1885 and came to Canada around 1900. He accompanied the Harkers and Bradshaws with a train load of horses.

Truman married Mary Jane Buhler, the eldest daughter of Charles and Mary Jane Buhler at Raymond in 1913 and they worked the farm of George Joseph Bone until they were able to go out on their own. They had nine children:

Trueman passed away on the 25 of November, 1938 and Mary Jane passed away in August 1968.

Our first farm was about fifteen miles south of Magrath. My parents started buying their own land in 1924. This farm was located on the main dirt road from Lethbridge to Cardston, about nine miles from Magrath and five miles from Spring Coulee. I have memories of pulling cars out of muddy barrow pits.

When the new gravel highway was built, it ran two miles to the south of our farm and was later black topped.

Truman Bone used to irrigate alfalfa fields for Ralph Thompson with l.V. Law who ran the elevator and Jack Curliss who was foreman for the cattle operation. Truman also stacked hay for added income and Mary Jane cooked for the crew.

It seemed later that everyone worked for Ralph Thompson at one time or another. including myself.

Some of my early memories included riding on the grain tank with my dad. We used four head of horses to haul wheat to Bradshaw and received twenty five cents a bushed. I recall an elevator agent saying to dad; "True, I sure hate to write this cheque" and dad replied "No harder than for me to take it."

My early recollections of Spring Coulee included the large community centre at the east end of town and the weekend dances, Boettcher's Garage and Welding Shop, Jolliffe's and Munroe's grocery stores, three elevators, the two story hotel and the baseball field behind the hotel.

John Thompson. who lived south-east of town had a large bell which was rung for lunch or disasters and could be heard for a long ways.

I remember Morris Curliss and others seeing who could put more hay on the buck rake to overload the stacker team and listening to Jack cuss because most of the time he could see what was taking place.

I recall walking to town with Lloyd and Garth Peterson and Blaine Curliss to buy pop and candy for ten cents. I also remember the blizzard in 1935-36 when three or four trains were stuck between Lethbridge and Cardston and seeing fellows taking a rest from shovelling, sitting on cross bars and telephone poles.

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Copyright © 2000
Mary Tollestrup