MARY'S GENEALOGY TREASURES
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Gust Carlson and
Johanna Jorgenson Carlson

Seven Persons - Once Hundred Sixty Acres and a Dream
As the Story was Told

Gust and Johanna Carlson and children: Carl, Agnes, Gilbert, Edith, Linnea, Gladys and Bertal

Gust Carlson, another Scandinavian immigrant, came from Lugnas, Sweden, in 1907. He worked in the lumber industry in British Columbia, then on the B and B gang that built bridges for the Canadian Pacific Railway, and later for his brother, Sam, who had a livery barn in Seven Persons.

On March 8th, 1912 he married Johanna Jorgenson, an immigrant from Kristiansand, Norway, who also worked for his brother, Sam. They too, took a homestead in the Red Rock District on the northeast of 32-8-7-4.

In 1924 they moved to Medicine Hat, and in 1925 they returned to Seven Persons to manage the business of Carlsons' Restaurant and Livery Barn while Sam and Marie, Bertha and Annie went on a vacation to Sweden. Later in the year Gust took over the position of section foreman at Bullshead and the family moved into the section house there. The children went to the State School. In 1929 they returned to their firm at Red Rock.

With distances great, the Gust Carlsons became quite fond of their neighbors, John Olsons, Ole Olsons, Ole Nerlands, Fred Kurpjuweits, Jonas Edlers and others. Parties, dinners and dances were held in their homes and in the school. The Carlson young folk were fond of athletics, so their home was a gathering place for games of baseball, softball, hockey, skating, skiing, horseshoe and, of course, cards, checkers and such indoor contests. Mrs. Carlson's coffee and delicious lunches always made the congregation more pleasant.

Mr. and Mrs. Carlson retired to Medicine Hat in 1946. The. old house still stands as a reminder of the happy folk who lived here, pioneers of this land when it was new.

Carl helped on the farm and became a fine mechanic. He taught himself to play an accordion, and for years formed part of an orchestra that played for all the dances in the surrounding area. He played with Sven Neilsen and Adolf Carlson, and became a fine musician. He married Hilda Edvardson and they had two children, a son and daughter. In 1942 he joined the services of World War II and lost his life from a land mine. A grave marker at Adegem, Flanders, Belgium bears the inscription: "Private C.W. Carlson, Canadian Infantry Corps. Oct. 10, 1944. Aged 31."

Agnes worked in Bow Island at the Myrtle Hotel. She took a hair dresser's course and applied her skills in Mrs. Ritchie's Beauty Parlor. She married Tom Scott and they had three sons and a daughter.

Gilbert farmed on his father's land and then purchased the holdings of Mr. Ole Nerland. Eventually he moved to the city.

Edith married George Constantine, a barber in Calgary. They have one son. Linnea became Mrs. Bud Thompson and had two children, a son and daughter. Gladys married Del Thompson, who was a grain buyer in Seven Persons for awhile. They went to Nanton to live and where Del became a government land assessor. They had three daughters.

Bertal continued to operate the family farm for three decades or so. His wife was the former Wilma Anderson, daughter of a Manyberries rancher, Roy Anderson. They had two sons and a daughter. These Carlsons moved to a holding on the northeast of 31-10-7-4 which is much nearer to Medicine Hat than their original home.

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Copyright 2000
Mary Tollestrup