MARY'S GENEALOGY TREASURES
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Thomas Moise Dickie and
his wife Mary Dickie

Taken from Our Treasured Heritage-
A History of Coalhurst and District
Pages 301 - 302

Thomas Moise Dickie came to Canada from Scotland in 1909. He was a fireman on the railroad. Mary Dickie joined him in 1910 and settled in Lethbridge. They moved to Coalhurst in 1911. They had eight children; five sons and three daughters. Samuel, born and died in Scotland. Phillip, born in Coalhurst and resided in Calgary until his death in 1982. John, born in Coalhurst and died in Coalhurst at the age of three.

The family lived in Diamond City, at the river bottom, for four years while Tom Sr. pumped the water for the town. One morning Mary heard water running under the house, and arose to find the house surrounded with water. She roused the children and collected everything that they could carry, then watched from the coulee as the house floated down the river, in the big flood. They then moved back to Coalhurst where Tom pumped water for the town for many years, sharing the shifts with his father, Samuel Dickie.

The family lived again at the river bottom, near the Quarantine Station. It was a very interesting place to live as they spent a lot of time watching the doctors work with the cattle, guinea pigs and white rats. Indians used the ford at the river by the pumping station, so the children made a number of good friends from the reserve. These friends often would stop to warm themselves and have tea at Grandmother Dickie's house.

When the family moved into the town of Coalhurst in order to be closer to school, the types of entertainment to be found increased. They attended West Lethbridge School dances, Newlands and Welshes's Barn dances, and dances at the Red Trail pavillion in Kipp. When the weather got bad they attended these functions by horse and sleigh. The first school the children attended burned down and they held school in the Catholic Church until a new one was built. There are also vivid memories of the big fire, when half of the town was burned (1934), and of the Mine explosion (1935).

After the explosion, the Dickie family moved to Calgary in 1937. Tom took a job with the Calgary Albertan until his retirement. Mary died in Calgary on September 15, 1958. Tom then lived with his son until his death on March 19, 1963.

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Copyright 2000
Mary Tollestrup