MARY'S GENEALOGY TREASURES
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Andrew and Alma Edwardsen

Seven Persons - Once Hundred Sixty Acres and a Dream
As the Story was Told

This much respected couple came to homestead at Seven Persons in 1909, from North Dakota. She had lived beside the Mouse River; he had immigrated from Norway. They built up a fine farm with suitable farm buildings, well-producing fields for wheat and oats, and fine herds of cattle and horses. They were good neighbors and good community builders. How often they helped people in establishing homes, people who were ill or in need of medical advice, or people in need of food or of money.

They hadn't children of their own so they loved and seemed to adopt all the children they knew. My sister, Edythe said, "She makes me feel like a queen. She makes me a special lunch with pretty table cloth ,best dishes, fancy cookies and a drink from a particular colored glass. She treats me like I am grown up and very important."

They were instrumental in maintaining a Norwegian Lutheran Church in the area. Services were held in that language, in private homes, by ministers broughtout from Medicine Hat . Baptisms, confirmations funeral services were performed. Following the services, bounteous lunches were served. Coffee was cooked in wash boilers and poured from two gallon coffee pots. It was good coffee and was always enjoyed. Every householder contributed lunch. There were sandwiches, buns, potato lefsa, crullers, doughnuts, fatiman, crumkaka, cookies and other delicacies, such as were appreciated in the 'old country'. Games of ball, horseshoe and tag amused the men and children while the women visited, cared for the children and planned future community functions. This was typically 'the Edwardsens'.

In 1928 they went to Norway to visit relatives. There they found Andrew's niece, Judith, an orphan of about five years of age. Her mother had died when she was a baby and her father had died about that time of their visit. It seemed opportune that they should adopt this little girl and bring her back to Canada to live with them.

They sold their holdings in 1936 and retired to White Rock, British Columbia to live by the ocean as had their ancestors. When Alma passed away Andrew moved into a senior citizens' home. He lived to be nearly ninety-nine years of age, a typically big strong Norseman. Gunster Bruins and his family now own the former Edwardsen homestead.

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Mary Tollestrup