MARY'S GENEALOGY TREASURES
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The Grain Elevators - Seven Persons

Seven Persons - Once Hundred Sixty Acres and a Dream

Chapter 17

There were five grain elevators: Ogilvie, Alberta Pacific, United Grain Growers, Farmers' Grain and Supply Company, and one privately owned by Mr. John Meyer, Senior. What fine edifices they were at that time. They were tall, taller than any other local building, and they were well-painted in distinguishable colors.

A gasoline motor chugged away to operate the machinery within. A series of buckets on chains moved the grain from bin to bin, or to railway cars without. Big doors at both sides enclosed the building. The main floor was raised to allow for the bin below into which the grain was poured.

Teams of horses nearly always tried to refuse to draw their load up and in, and their drivers always insisted. Sometimes there was a bit of a battle. Once inside, the doors were closed, the wagon load weighed, resting on two movable platforms, was tip-tipped to cause the grain to flow into the pit. Again the wagon was weighted to a ascertain the weight of the grain, the ticket was made out and the check completed. The doors rolled open and the driver was on his way.

With progress down though the years, trucks came into use for the moving of all grain.

During some years these elevators did record breaking buying of grain. Long freight trains took the golden kernels to far away markets or to nearby Medicine Hat's three busy flour mills. Those well employed elevators denoted prosperity to the village, to the countryside, to the grain companies, and to the individual farmers.

Eventually drought caused less grain to be produced. One by one, these elevators were torn down and moved to other centres where they were needed. In about 1925 the Alberta Wheat Pool organization was formed. It was farmer-owned to help control the sale and selling price of grain. It purchased one of these buildings, which with some renovations, remains in Seven Persons today. The organization has continued.

Names of some of the grain buyers were: John Le Grande of Farmers' Grain and Supply Company, J. Hubbs of Ogilvie, John Meyer, Senior, of Alberta Pacific, W. Fleming, Jim Paul (1927-1928), Francis Jones, Mr. Morris, Jim Crawford, Gilbert Hill, H. Coristine, Del Thompson, Gordon Ismond, George Plews and Ernie Nunweiller.

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Copyright 2000
Mary Tollestrup