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James Henry Hadfield and
Mary Jane Morehead Hadfield

Heritage of the High Country-
A History of Del Bonita and surrounding Districts
Pages 360-361

James Henry Hadfield (Jim) was born in Smithfield, Cache County, Utah, on November 21, 1871. He was the oldest son of James Barber Hadfield and Marguerite (Gardner) Hadfield, both natives of England. Jim's father learned the weaver's trade in England, and after coming to the United States he settled in Philadelphia where he followed the same occupation. In 1867 he went by trail overland to Utah. He obtained land in Cache Valley and in the Malad Valley. He also burned lime in Smithfield, being among the first to construct kilns there.

James Henry (Jim) attended school and got his education in Smithfield, then entered the Utah Agriculture College at Logan, Utah. After graduation he worked with his father on the home farm and also teamed how to burn lime. He served as a missionary in Holland for the L. D. S. Church, returning home in 1895.

On the 4th of January, 1899 he married Mary Jane Morehead in the Logan Temple.

Mary Jane was born February 17, 1872 in Smithfield, Utah. She was the tenth child of Preston Thomas Morehead and Cordelia Smith Morehead. She was a very talented young lady. She had a beautiful voice and loved to sing. She was also interested in art, and painted both in pastels and oil.

Jim and his young wife decided to move to Canada. Jim came first, arriving in Lethbridge April 25, 1899. He homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres of raw prairie land, the S.E. V4-30-1-23-W4th, located then in the Taylorville area. Mary joined her husband a month later. Their first home was a granary in which they lived until their frame house, sixteen by twenty feet, could be built.

Jim was a hard worker and a good manager. He gradually increased his holdings in this area until at one time they amounted to eleven hundred and twenty acres. He engaged in stock raising as well as farming, making a specialty of pureblooded Berkshire hogs. He also raised Hereford cattle, sheep, and horses.

When the Valleyfield School District #3327 was formed in the Whiskey Gap area, much of his land including his original homestead was in this district.

In 1917 he sold his holdings and moved to Cardston. In 1918 he was one of the organizers of the Cardston Farming Company Incorporated, of which he was the manager. This company operated eighteen hundred and ten acres of choice land with seventeen hundred acres of it under cultivation.

In 1922 he was forced to foreclose and repossess his holdings in Whiskey Gap. Jim and his sons, Harold, Gerald, and Jim built up the farm and livestock again.

It was a real boon to the whole area when in 1928-29 the C.P.R. came to Whiskey Gap. This became Jim's shipping point for his grain and livestock. What an advantage this was. It saved the long haul to Woolford with grain and the return trip home with supplies.

The village in Whiskey Gap built up fast. Before long it boasted a General Store, operated by Alvin and Dorothy Knight; Frank Eyre's blacksmith shop; the Advance Lumber Yard operated by Charlie Secretan; and Clair Kimball's Butcher Shop. Huey Gum even had a restaurant and rooms. So now Jim and the other members of the community could obtain most of their needs right at home. This made life much easier.

Jim loved his land and its location. He spent much of his time there even in his later years. After a brief illness he passed away March 29, 1943 in Cardston. His wife, Mary Jane, also passed away in Cardston March 23, 1952.

They had six children; three daughters and one son. Gerald was deceased in 1977, and Thelma was deceased 1934.

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Mary Tollestrup