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Nunham Stanford and
Amy Frances Hunter

Nunham Stanford (1880 - 1949)
and Amy Frances Hunter (1886 - 1941)
by Nunham Stanford

My grandfather, Nunham Stanford, was born 27 May 1880 in Ogden Utah. He was the seventh of ten children of Alfred Stanford and Elizabeth Jenkins, both English converts to the church who emigrated to the Boston, Mass. area in the late 1850's, trekking to Utah in 1860.

The family moved to St. Anthony , Idaho about 1886 and Nunham grew up there. He was called on his mission to the Northern States in 1901 and returned in 1903.

Early in 1904 he came up the Southern Alberta and filed papers on a homestead on the SW 1/4 of 14 14-28-4. Which is located about 2 1/2 miles west of Stavely, Alberta.

He married Amy Frances Hunter, the oldest child of Heman Hyde Hunter and Fanny Frances Fawson, who was born 23 Jun 1886 in Oakley, Idaho, on 25 Sept 1904 in Ogden, Utah.

Their first child, Amy Gladys Stanford was born on the Egin Bench, Idaho, 15 May 1905. Some time in the fall of 1906 they came by train to Stavely with their household goods and animals. Their second child and first son, Nunham Glenn Stanford, was born on the homestead 04 Jan 1907. The rest of the family, 5 daughters and 5 sons, were born on the homestead.

Nunham was followed to the Stavely area by his oldest brother Thomas Barnett Stanford, his youngest brother, Jesse Stanford and a younger sister, Ada Myrtle Stanford who was married to Joseph Smith Brown, also from the St. Anthony area. Thomas eventually went back to the States - settling in Washington state. Jesse moved to the Cardston area.

Joe Brown was called as bishop of the Pine Coulee Ward when it was organized in 1910. He chose Nunham Stanford as one of his councilors. Joe Brown was released as bishop in 1936, and Nunham was called as bishop in his place. He was released in September of 1941, and his son, Hugh Stanford, was called in his place.

Nunham was a farmer and rancher and active in the affairs of the church. He served a short mission during the winter of the one following years, about 1917 or so, leaving the affairs of the farm to his wife and older children. He and his third wife, Johanna, served in the California Mission shortly before his death 08 November 1949

Nunham Stanford was a typical pioneer of his time. He worked long and hard, and expected his family to do the same. He was a good judge of and worker with horses.

He was noted and repected in the community for his honesty and hard work. He always paid his debts.

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Copyright 2000
Mary Tollestrup