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Eenen seer schoonen, ende excellenten Cocboeck

Carolus Battus (also known as Carolum Battum, Karol Batel, and other spellings)

Dordrecht: Detweede Editie, 1593.



Online facsimile: here (opens new window).

Online transcription by Marleen Willebrands: here (opens new window).



Rough translation into English by James Prescott -- Copyright © 2013, 2019 James Prescott



    NOTE: this is a fast and rough translation. There will be many errors! Use caution. Nevertheless it may be interesting or useful until a proper English translation becomes available. Words for which I found no suitable translation within the time allotted are "within quotes". Words which are not in quotes but which don't seem to be English will be found in either Larousse Gastronomique (1961 translation) or in the full Oxford English Dictionary. Words with a hyphen, such as sweet-milk, are often multi-word translations of single Dutch words. My speculative changes or translations or other comments are [in square brackets].


    Improvements to the translation are welcome. Contact me here.


    Updated 2019-July-12.



 


Thanks for word puzzle solving:

    Karen Groeneveld for noting that "dayen" means "dates".


 

Eenen seer schoonen, ende excellenten Cocboeck


A very clean, and excellent cookbook, containing all kinds of very experienced cooking of roasts, stews, pasties, pies, tarts, custards, sauces, broths, and such. Also diverse preserves and drinks, etc.



1. How to fill eggs.

Take hard-boiled eggs, peel, and cut them through the middle and take the yolks out. Then take green herbs, to wit: rosemary, marjoram, and such. Then take a jar of water, and leave in the steam bowls, then add your herbs, and leave in a small-boiler or two to boil. Then take the herbs again out of the water, and put in a mortar, and put therewith the hard-boiled egg [yolks], pound together very small and then put therewith: sugar, cinnamon, mace, ginger, powdered, and stir well together. Also so fill the hollow of the egg whites with these herbs, each half egg separately. Also so take a pan with butter, leave to become brown, and lay the half filled eggs therein, with the herbs toward the pan, and so leave to roast. You might also turn well, and as you think that it is enough, so serve to the tables, and sprinkle thereon sugar.


2. How to make blanc-manger on the fast-days.

Take rice flour and sweet-milk. Boil together and add sugar and rose-water as much as you please. If you wish, you might also add eggs and serve in dishes.


3. How to make blanc-manger.

Take peeled almonds, pound very small with some crumbs of white-bread and then put through a sieve with some Ptuj wine or Rhenish wine. Then set it on the fire and put therewith sugar until it is as sweet as you want and also add some white ginger powdered, if you wish. Leave it to boil until it is thick and then put over a broiled capon and sprinkle thereon blood-coloured dragees and serve to the tables.


4. A sauce on a boiled capon.

Boil the capon in hotchpotch-broth. Then crush your almonds very small and take crumbs of the whitest bread. Set to soak in this broth and put therewith sugar, white ginger powdered and white wine (or no sugar if you wish). Put this together with the almonds through a sieve and leave to boil as much as you think good and then put on the boiled capon and serve to the tables.


5. How to make blanc-manger of Spain.

Take an old hen or capon and cut it in half. Then take the muscle thereout and pick very small. Then take sweet-milk and first boil it and add rice flour with the pickings and leave together to boil and also thus add much sugar and leave together to stand to preserve. Then serve in dishes.


6. How to make custard or "Sanen" [type of creme bouilli ?] or creme of Moerbeke in the winter.

Take a firkin of sweet cream. Add two egg yolks very small-beaten, one and a half spoons of wheat-flour and as much sugar as you please. Put this together through a sieve and then put therewith some rose-water. Then set it on the fire and let it come to a boil once and then put in dishes and serve to the tables.


7. How to make Dutch custard.

Take a jar of sweet cream or sweet-milk -- however the cream is best -- and set it on the fire until it is warm. Then take thereout a spoon or two full and put herewith a handful of wheat-flour and eight or nine eggs with the white very small-beaten and stir it with the flour and put together through a sieve. Then take a little of the same in a spoon and then put in the hot cream that stands on the fire, so here a bit and there a bit and leave a little to stiffen properly as if it were clotted. Then take a spoon full of the same paste and pour some everywhere [on] the rim all carefully, then place some carefully everywhere on the rim however do not stir and leave also to stand until it is a bit stiff and sprinkle therein or thereon a bit of salt. Put therewith or thereover much sugar. Then take from the fire and leave to become cold. Then put carefully in a dish and serve.


8. How to make elderflower-custard.

Take sweet-milk and elderflower-flowers. Boil it on [the fire] a bit and then leave to stream through a sieve. Make thus very tasty from the flowers as you please. Then add wheat-flour until it is as thick as you want. Leave so together to boil and stir well. If you wish, you might put therewith much sugar and herbs.


9. How to make a special custard.

Take a jar of sweet cream, six egg yolks, a cruse of rose-water, six spoons of wheat-flour, and enough sugar. Then boil together, however do not let it burn. When it is thick enough, so dress it in dishes and serve. If you wish, you might also put therewith cinnamon.


10. How to make almond-custard.

Take peeled almonds. Crush them very small and put through a sieve with some sweet-milk and take three or four small-spoons of flour or as much as you please. Temper the flour with sweet-milk and then put also through the sieve with the other and add much sugar. Leave to boil until it is thick enough, however stir well and then dress it in dishes.


11. How to make small-whore's-farts.

Take roasted white-bread, wine, eggs, ginger, and sugar. Mix well together and bake hereof small-cakes in the pan with butter and scrape thereon sugar and serve.


12. How to make cloven nuns.

Take hard-boiled eggs and remove the yolks into a mortar. Then put therewith broiled apples, cinnamon and sugar. Crush it together well and put this paste in the egg whites and bake in the brown butter. Then sprinkle thereover cinnamon and sugar and serve to the tables.


13. How to make bone-marrow-custard.

Take a pint of sweet-milk, Rhenish wine, two spoons of strained or melted bone-marrow, and put herewith grated white-bread and much bread-sugar. Leave this together to stand a length of time to boil on coals until it is not too thick or too thin and then dress it on.


14. How to make a Spanish sop.

Take white-bread, cut the crusts off and cut in round slices. Then roast your bread well in a pan with butter. Then take the bread dry out of the pan and put with the same butter in the pan a cruse of Rhenish [wine] or red wine and a dish full of sour-cherries with the stones removed. Boil it very soft in the pan. Now when it is done, put also therewith sugar-dates, cinnamon-powder, and some ginger-powder. Leave together in a small-boiler to boil, then pour over your bread and make as sweet and as strong as you wish and serve.


15. How to prepare currants.

Take currants, wine and sugar and whole cloves. Leave this together in a clean small-pot on coals to stand to preserve until you think that it is enough and then serve on or set it beside.


16. How to prepare quinces on sops with bone-marrow.

Take the quinces, peel and remove the cores. Put therewith bone-marrow, currants, sugar, and Rhenish wine. Leave so to stew until it is enough. Then roast small-slices of white-bread, lay that under in the dish, pour thereover your broth and set on the quinces. Then serve thus to the tables. If you wish, you might put therewith also cinnamon and ginger. Also you might small-cut the quinces at the first and all thus to stew and put on your bread.


17. To make a wine-sop.

Take white-bread, cut the crusts off and cut in round slices. Then broil in the roaster without burning. Then butter your roasted bread well and sprinkle on each layer much sugar, cinnamon, and ginger. If you wish, then fill your dish with bastard [wine] or other good wine. Leave thus in the dish to stand to boil on coals until you think that it is enough and if it becomes too dry so add more wine. Sprinkle thereon sugar and cinnamon and serve thus to the tables.


18. How to make wine-cakes.

Take three eggs with the white and three without the white. Beat that well together and put therewith three or four small-spoons of Rhenish wine and grated white-bread and sugar as much as you please, also some melted butter and temper it well together, however leave the butter to become a bit brown in a pan. Then take a spoon full of the same and lay here and there in the pan and bake thereof small-cakes just as one bakes the "Deusegeerkens" [sweet bread-like cookies] and then sprinkle thereon those that you please and then serve on.


19. How to make a onion-sop.

Take onion, cut it in slices and roast it in oil with the crusts of the bread. When this now has cooked a while, so put therewith some vinegar, some beer, some sugar, and some ginger-powder. Leave this together to boil until it begins to become thick and [then place it in the dish to be eaten] also in the dish put and poured.


20. How to make quince-pasties.

Peel the quince-apples or -pears and cut the cores out. Leave the pears or apples whole and take bone-marrow, sugar, cinnamon, some ginger and many currants. Mix together, stick it in the pears and set so whole in fine dough. Put therewith butter and sprinkle over the pears in the pasty currants, cinnamon, sugar and some ginger. Then lay its peel thereon and then leave to bake additionally in the oven or pan until is enough. One takes to six pears a spoon full of cinnamon, four ounces of sugar, and the bone-marrow from a shank or bone-marrow-pipe; and when this has baked together a hour in the dough, also add a cruse of wine and leave now an hour to bake.


21. How to make a capon-pasty in the winter manner and also in the summer [manner] and also sour-cherries-pasties.

21a Take your dough and form it on the capon, fold the capon as it befits and lay in your dough. Then take chopped bacon and fresh butter as much as you wish and also egg yolks, Damson plums, dates sliced in long pieces, and broiled chestnuts, an ounce of ginger-powder, with cinnamon-powder with the other and let it stand together to bake until it is done.

21b And if you wish to bake the capon in the summer, prepare it as above and lay it in the dough. Then take chopped bacon, fresh butter, good wine and salt appropriately, with an ounce of ginger-powder. This together boiled a while and then put with the capon. Leave additionally to bake as it befits and take at the last some verjuice and put it in the pasty and then leave now a bit to bake and then it is enough.

21c In these suggested manners you might also make the sour-cherries-pasties, just as the capon is cooked.


22. How to make venison-pasties.

22a Take and cut your venison as it befits or as you want it and "frobbeseret" [parboil?] or scald not very [much]. Then lay a night in wine-vinegar and also lard it well and stuff it with ginger and pepper-powder and additionally with good fine herbs and lay all in the dough and additionally bake the pasty as it befits.

22b Item take to a pasty three pounds of flesh, a half half-ounce of pepper, a half-ounce of ginger, a half half-ounce of whole-nutmeg, and a quarter-part of a half-ounce of cloves, and a pound of raisins, a bit of saffron, and a bit of vinegar.


23. How to make a very good pasty.

Take a udder of a cow and an oxen-foot and a tongue of an ox. Boil it very tender and then chop together very small and take thereto much bone-marrow or if you can obtain no bone-marrow, so take oxen-suet of the kidney-bed and many currants and one and a half half-ounces of cinnamon-powder, a half-ounce of ginger-powder, a quarter-part of a half-ounce of mace-powder, and as much sugar as you think good, and a bit of salt. Mix this all together and lay in the pasty and leave to bake until you think that it is enough, however your pasty should be very fatty.


24. How to make a thigh-pasty in pastry in the Spanish manner.

Take a wether-thigh, cut the flesh all off of the bone, leave the bone all whole. Chop the flesh very small with suet of the ox. Then take 30 egg yolks and a little fine green herbs very small-chopped-up, ginger, cinnamon, mace, cloves, and saffron powdered all together 3 half-ounces and mix all together with the chopped flesh. Then take a caul of a sheep and lay a half hour in warm water and make brown dough for your pasty and then lay therein the caul from the sheep. Then put your chopped mixed paste in the caul and lay therein the bone in the middle and then slit [tie?] the caul there everywhere and then put thereon the top-crust tight and leave to bake for most of two hours.


25. How to make a high pasty on the fast-days.

Take heads of cods, make clean and boil them tender. Then chop very small with a piece of boiled salmon and then add ginger, cinnamon, saffron, currants, and Rhenish wine, of each as much as you think good, and then put in white dough and leave to bake as it befits.


26. How to make white dough for pasties.

Take flour and two eggs, unmelted butter and if it is a flesh-day, then take roast-fat instead of butter and some well-water and work that together into dough and form it as you wish. Now additionally how to make the pasty-crusts: so take flour, unmelted butter with cold water and make thereof dough and as you wish to make pies thereof, so lay your pies on clean white paper and then on the outside and on the inside rubbed with melted butter and then take your paste, when they are all made, in a pot or as one wishes and then lay in the oven in dough. Sprinkle thereon sugar, cinnamon, and butter and leave thus to bake.


27. How to bake fasting-cakes or ravioli.

Take grated white-bread, some salt, and some yeast, butter, and some saffron, and work your fasting-cakes and put on greased white paper in the oven and leave to bake.


28. How to make Bourbonnais paste.

Take a jar of sweet milk and add butter and flour and 12 egg yolks small-beaten and leave this together to boil and when it is enough, leave to become cold and add sugar and stir well and serve, sprinkle thereon some [sugar] if you wish.


29. How to make an almond-pie.

Take to a middle-[sized] dish five quarter-parts of a pound of peeled almonds and crush them as small as you might and put therewith eight or nine apples also small-crushed; stir and pound that with the almonds. Then put therewith four or five ounces of currants, sugar, cinnamon, ginger, grains of paradise, and mace to your taste and stir well with the crushed almonds and apples. Then lay in fine dough and leave thus to bake and while that one pounds the almonds, so that it does not become too dry, so add now and then a spoon of wine.


30. How to make a cheese-pie.

Take fresh small-cream-cheese and egg yolks with flour and some butter and this together small-pounded and then lay in the dough.


31. How to make a Bourbonnais pie.

Take to a middle-[sized] dish a pint of sweet cream, four egg yolks small-beaten with a cruse of rose-water, and put therewith as much flour as you think good to have the paste reasonably thick and leave so to stand to boil on coals and stir well that it is not burnt and then when it is boiled with the cream, so add much sugar and leave now to boil a bit until you think that it is enough and then leave to cool a bit and put it in your dough. Let bake and as you serve on so sprinkle thereon cinnamon and sugar on the top-crust, if you wish.


32. How to make a pie that one calls Doornik pie.

Take apples small-chopped and put therewith egg yolks, cinnamon, and sugar as much as you think good, and melted butter. Mix this together and lay in your dough and leave to bake.


33. How to make a "Viadre" [type of pie] pie.

Take fifteen or sixteen apples and make thereof good pomace that is very soft and take hereto a pint of sweet cream and eight or ten eggs with white very small-beaten, or eleven egg yolks and no white very small-beaten. This shall one stir well together or put through a sieve when it is cold and then put it in your dough and let bake and if you wish, you might put therewith also spices and sugar as you think good.


34. How to make a chervil-pie.

Take fresh cheese and a large handful of chervil small-chopped-up, also let it come to a boil for a bit, the water pushed out a bit and then five or six eggs with whites small-beaten and well stirred together with the cheese and chervil and then laid in your dough and lay therein much butter everywhere and leave thus to bake and as you put it on, so stick therein butter.


35. How to make a quince-pie in a dish.

Take the quinces, peel and quarter them, boil it very soft in clean water, remove the water well from the quinces when they are done or one boils them well in wine. When this is done, then take wine, white sugar and egg whites small-beaten. Leave this together to boil well and skim it clean and when it is very clear, put with your quinces. If you wish, you might put therewith also some spices and then leave together now to boil a bit and when you think that it is enough, put it in your dishes and stuff it as it pleases you or unstuffed and serve to the tables.


36. How to bake a special pie.

Take 6 or 7 quince-apples or -pears boiled soft in clean water or broiled soft. Take the soft [stuff] and four ounces of peeled almonds, fresh curds, four ounces, a handful of raisins with the stones removed, and this together very small-crushed and then make sweet with sugar and cinnamon and other herbs until you think it is good and 6 or 7 egg yolks, 4 ounces of fresh butter. Mix this together and lay in dough, however if you wish to make this pie for invalid people, so take instead of the curds the flesh of a boiled partridge or chicken, cut and pound very small and do as it is suggested.


37. How to make pies of dates.

Take the dates, make clean and cut it in small pieces and put therewith bone-marrow, much sugar and cinnamon and some ginger, if you wish, and lay this in dough.


38. How to make an almond-pie in the English manner.

Take almonds, remove the peels and crush them very small with rose-water and much sugar. Pound well one and a half hours long, then lay in the dough without a top-cover, the rims decorated and leave to bake until it is enough. Spare no sugar and sprinkle there so what you please.


39. How to make knights [pies] or Jacobin-pies.

Take bone-marrow of oxen, sugar, and cinnamon. Chop this well together with some ginger and then put therewith currants and rose-water -- you might put therewith what you please -- and lay this paste in very fine dough and cover with fine dough, made very thin, and leave so to bake and serve warm to the tables and sprinkle thereon sugar and cinnamon.


40. How to make a Jacobin-pie on the fast-days.

Take salmon and eel boiled very tender and then the fish-bones well removed and the fish very small-crushed in a mortar and then put therewith cinnamon, sugar, ginger, and currants with some butter and this baked covered in its dough, and when it is enough, so sprinkle thereon sugar and cinnamon and serve warm to the tables.


41. How to make a brown pie.

Take apples, pound in a mortar with fresh butter and then put therewith brown sugar, cinnamon, and ginger. Then make thereof a pie and lay therein 10 or 12 raw egg yolks. Cover and bake thus and serve warm and sprinkle thereon cinnamon, ginger, and sugar, and if you have no brown sugar, thus roast your apples in the brown butter and then pounded and made with white sugar. So are the pies thus the best.


42. How to make creme-frite.

Take a jar of sweet cream and a half pound of butter and leave this together to boil in a pan or boiler. Then take twelve egg yolks small-beaten and put through a sieve. The cream should stand on the fire and not hang, and then pour the yolks individually in the cream, however when pouring, so should one stir and watch that it does not burn. Then take the crumb of a white-bread small-grated and shake the same therein and stir well together and leave the same now a quarter-part of an hour to boil, and when the paste is thickened, so add also sugar and leave now to boil a bit. Then pour in a dish and leave to stand to cool and then put in your dough. Additionally leave to bake, however it should be very fat from butter and be served warm. Then sprinkle thereon sugar. From this paste you might make all manners of pies. One makes therewith also all forms to fill that one bakes in the oven such as lions, dolphins, and more other as it pleases you. In this manner you might make creme-frite of sweet-milk instead of cream, to wit: to a jar of sweet milk [take] one pound of butter. Otherwise it is all the same.


43. How to make fasting-cakes-paste.

Take eggs and a bit of yeast and beat it together very small. Warm some sweet-milk and put that therein with some melted butter and then put flour therein. Temper it well together so that it is appropriately thick, so that it streams well when you wish to pour.


44. How to make a sweet pie.

Take white cheese and break it very small with a little rose-water and four eggs small-beaten with some flour, and a good part of fresh butter and take spinach or young chard very small-chopped-up or pounded and some pepper-powder, if you wish, and mix this all together. Then make your dough very fine and make square and add your paste and cut the cover to squareness and leave to bake.


45. How to make a milk-crustless-flan.

Take to a jar of milk a spoon of flour and a good 20 eggs small-beaten and leave together to boil a quarter-part of a hour. Then put therewith a little butter and a bit of salt and sugar, until it is as sweet as you want and then put in the cups and leave to bake. You might also make this in a dish.


46. How to make apple-crustless-flans.

Take golden-apple, peel and cut it in pieces and put in a pot with some wine and butter and leave so to stand to braise. Rub apart very small and then put therewith half as much grated white-bread as you have apples and five egg yolks, ginger, and sugar. Mix this all together. This is for two dishes. Rub your dishes with butter and then add your paste and set your dishes on a coal-fire and leave to bake until it is so stiff that it lifts off the rims. Then sprinkle thereon sugar and cinnamon and serve to the tables.


47. How to make a quince-crustless-flan.

Take three or four quinces, boil it very soft in water and then take cream, eggs, and some flour and mix together. If you wish you might put therewith sugar and herbs and make hereof a custard in a dish or cup and leave to bake.


48. How to make a special crustless-flan.

Take four ounces of peeled almonds, four ounces of rice, an hour cooked in sweet-milk. Pound this together very small with a bit of rose-water, then put therewith seven or eight eggs small-beaten, put it together through a sieve and then mix therewith sweet cream as much as you think good and sugar as sweet as you want. Make this warm together in a pot then put therein four ounces of fresh butter. Then set this together in a dish on coal-fire under and above and leave to bake and then sprinkle thereon what you want and serve.


49. How to prepare quinces for the table.

Take 12 quinces and cut them through the middle. Remove the pips into a fine small-cloth and put with the peeled quinces in a pot and leave to boil in wine. Put therewith a pound of sugar or less, until you find that good and a bit of saffron to colour. When the pears are done and the broth is thick enough, so dress it on in dishes.


50. How to prepare quinces on sops with bone-marrow.

Take your quinces, peel and remove the cores and then stick therein bone-marrow and currants and stuff them [when] done with Rhenish wine and sugar, and cut small-slices of white-bread in your small-dishes and set thereon your pears and pour thereover your broth and serve to the tables.


51. How to prepare pears in Hippocras.

Take pears, peel and cut with some off for eating, leave there-on the stalks and stick in your pears cloves and crush in red wine and add mace, sugar, and cinnamon. Leave to stew until it is enough and if the wine is not red enough, so put therewith carrots or turnsole and if you want it yellow, so add white wine and saffron and additionally as above -- also pears broiled in butter -- in a pot. When it is enough, so sprinkle thereon sugar, cinnamon, and a bit of ginger. These pears one should also take whole with the stalks.


52. How to prepare Damson plums.

Take your plums and boil them in wine and then put therewith much sugar and cinnamon and leave so to stew until it is enough.


53. How to make "Geerinol" [name of dish] pears.

53a Take of the best roasting-pears, leave the stalks therein and wrap with wet-flax so that they remain unburnt and then roast it on hot coals and then peel and make thereover a sauce with red wine, sugar, and pounded almonds that is too thick to strain, and if it is too pale, colour it with turnsole, however make it sweet enough and it should be so thick that it remains lying on the pears and lay thereon long banquet-sugar and then serve.

53b Now in another manner. The pears peeled and the stalks left therein and boiled in white wine until it is soft. Then take the wine that the pears are boiled in and add much sugar and some starch and some saffron. Leave this together to boil until it is thick and then pour on the pears. It should be so thick that it remains hanging on the pears, however watch well that it is not lumpy.


54. How to make village-style paste of apples.

Take your apples, pound very small and put therewith butter, cinnamon, and sugar. Leave this together to stew and then serve. If you wish, you might also leave out egg yolks from the apple-sauce on the fast-days: peel and chop very small, put therewith cinnamon, sugar, egg yolks, melted butter, and ginger. This all together laid in dough and left to bake and then sugar sprinkled thereon. Also apples peeled and in wine and butter boiled soft and with three or four egg yolks strained and add much sugar and cinnamon and some ginger and sprinkle thereon cinnamon.


55. How to make "Gimbraes" [gingery dessert].

Take 2 or 3 half-ounces of pot-sugar and for each half-ounce of sugar 1 half-ounce of ginger, for each half-ounce of ginger a third-part of a half-ounce of saffron, however first leave the sugar to become soft on the fire with a little wine and when the sugar is well melted, then take a good part of grated cake and put herewith the melted sugar with the saffron and ginger. Mix well with the other and leave to stand so long on the fire until it begins to dry. Then put it in your containers.


56. How to make crepes or twisted omelettes.

Take five or six eggs, beat very small, add some flour, however not very much, so that it is thin enough to stream. Then take a pan with hot, sweet butter and leave therein to stream through a small-funnel, as it befits.


57. How to make almond-butter on the fast-days or outside the fast-days.

Take one and a half pounds of almonds, crush them with a jar or stoup of water and put it through a sieve just as for almond-milk. Then put the milk in a clean pot and leave to boil. Add a quarter-part of a cruse of verjuice, leave to stand quietly to become cold without stirring. When it is cold, put in a sack or sieve and the looser the sack is, the drier and better the butter is, and leave to hang to drip a night and day until the whey is well out. Then remove the thick [stuff] from the sack and add sugar, until it is as sweet as you want and then make thereof lilies or a piece of butter, as you want it.


58. The same in another manner.

Take a pound of almonds, the skins removed, pound very small, so small that you can not feel roughness between the fingers. Then put therewith a firkin of cream, some rose-water so that it thereafter tastes [of rose-water] and as much sugar until it is sweet enough. Leave to boil until it is thick enough, however stir well so that it does not burn. Then pour in a dish and stir well so that it does not burn and beat it very steadily until it is cold. Lay in a dish just as for a small-pound of butter. When the butter is thus made, so lay here and there in the butter pomegranate pips and serve. And if it is in the violet-time, so lay here and there violet-petals instead of the pomegranate-pips. Then take also blue violet-petals and boil that in half rose-water and half well-water. Then take of this boiled water and boil your crushed almonds therein, instead of cream and ready your butter as above and serve to the tables.


59. How to make an omelette Lombardy that is coloured for a banquet.

Take a pint of Rhenish wine and some fresh butter and some sugar and rose-water, if you wish. Leave this together to boil and take twenty-four egg yolks small-beaten and strained, as you wish and then leave to stream into the wine. Leave to boil on coals until it is thick enough, however stir until it is thick enough. Then lay in a dish in elongated pieces [the one] beneath the other, then sprinkle thereon sugar. These eggs Lombardy one lays in the dish with several colours: made with saffron yellow, with turnsole red, and spinach green, however you should make several. Also you might take egg yolks, Rhenish wine almost as much and much sugar. Leave this to boil on coals until it is thick. Then serve.


60. How to make eggs Lombardy on the fast-days.

Take almonds, pound very small with the skins, then put whole thick through a sieve with half Rhenish wine and half bastard [wine] and as you put the last pass through -- that falls much thinner than the first -- there you shall add some rice and boil a bit. Then pound small and put through [a sieve] and then put it with the almonds and add some crumbs of white-bread and then wring together through [a sieve] and put therewith some saffron and a reasonable amount of sugar. Then leave together to boil until it is thick enough and then serve to the tables.


61. How to make pasties.

Take bone-marrow, small-chopped and put therewith currants, cinnamon, and sugar and -- if you wish -- some ginger and two or three egg yolks small-beaten. Mix this together and lay your paste in fine dough and make it appropriately just as for apple-small-ravioli. Then set in the oven, leave to bake and serve warm to the tables.


62. To serve "Cocage" [kind of eggnog?] instead of pastry.

Take 15 egg yolks small-beaten, put through a sieve with a pint of sweet wine and then put therewith two eat-spoons of flour. Then put in a pot a half pound of out-kneaded butter and melt that. Then put this paste in the pot with the butter and stir well so that it does not coagulate, however do not "raect" [?] the pot and if it is coagulated, so put it through a sieve. Then put it in dishes and sprinkle thereon what you wish.


63. How to bake thick waffles that one cleaves.

63a Take six eggs, a bit of yeast, warm beer, fresh butter, and flour. Temper this together well and make thereof hard dough and lay the dough in a clean cloth by the fire, until begins to rise or to go. Then bake or [>and] cleave it and pour thereon melted butter and serve.

63b That one does not cleave. Take six eggs with the white and six without the white, a spoon of yeast, beat very small and take a half cruse of warm beer and the half more butter than beer melted together and much sugar and flour and temper it so thick that the spoon stays upright therein and set it in a "verre" [?] by the fire, until it rises and then bake and melt butter with sugar made hot and pour it over the waffles.


64. In another manner.

Take eight egg yolks, two eggs with the white, and a spoon of yeast and beat it together very small and put herewith a jar of sweet warm milk, a half pound of melted butter, and clean flour and mix together so that it is just like a thin custard and set it by the fire and as it begins to go, so might you go to bake and put thereover butter if you wish.


65. Now how to bake thick waffles.

Take for each waffle an egg and some yeast, beat very small and for twelve waffles a pound of melted butter and some warm water and flour and this together mixed, so thick that the spoon stays therein upright and by the fire set until it rises, and then baked and butter and sugar put thereover.


66. How to make thin waffles or wafers.

Take lukewarm water, melted butter, bread-sugar, and some meal-sugar and white flour, and together mixed and baked.


67. How to bake round banquet[-] or well-small-waffles.

Take egg yolks, a good bit of yeast and a good bit of lukewarm water, some ginger, nutmeg, mace, clean flour, and clean clarified butter. This tempered together so thick that it is a bit thicker than omelettes, tempered, and leave it to go [=rise] a bit, and bake and serve. In this paste should be also a bit of rose-water.


68. How to make flat cheese.

Take sweet milk and boil it, then take off of [the fire] and leave to become lukewarm. Put therein a spoon full of butter-milk and stir this therein and set it where it is warmish to stand and when it is coagulated very stiff, thus put it in a cloth and leave to hang to drip until the whey is well out. Then take the thick and sweet cream, two egg yolks and sugar until you think it is appropriately [for the dish] and then put it in the cheese-small-basins and then in your dishes and put thereon cream and serve.


69. How to make a butter-milk cheese.

Take thick butter-milk and hang in a cloth so that the whey leaks well out. Then take the thick and sweet cream, egg yolks, and sugar. Mix well together and then set it in your cheese-small-basins and then put it in your dish and put thereover cream.


70. How to make creme-bouilli or "Sanen" [type of crème bouilli ?].

Take sweet-milk and boil it well; the longer it is boiled, the thicker the "Sanen". Then leave to cool until it is blood-lukewarm. Then take sour fat cream and put that therein. Stir well together and then put it through a sieve if you want the evenness. This one does into an earthen pot otherwise one does not do it. Set it where it is warm and cover it with a cushion and leave so to stand a night, until it is well coagulated and then stir well and serve to the tables. Instead of the cream you might also take "Sanen" and for six or seven jars of milk you might take a good firkin or a bit less of cream or "Sanen". If you wish, so might you also boil egg yolks in it.


71. How to make sour-cherry-sauce.

Take sour-cherries and remove the stones and put therewith some thick red wine or some other wine or nothing [more than] its own broth and put therewith some butter, sugar, and some ginger and cinnamon -- as it pleases you -- and four or five egg yolks until you have it good and leave well to boil and then put through a sieve. Then you might boil it again a bit and then add first-times the sugar and the herbs.


72. How to make gooseberry-sauce.

Take the gooseberries, boil them soft in clean water or some wine or in their own broth and when it is done, so put through a sieve and put therewith some butter, ginger, cinnamon, much sugar, and two or three eggs. Leave together to boil and as you dress it on, sprinkle thereon sugar.


Nota: All that one does through a sieve, one should put through hot.


73. How to make small-sausages.

Take fresh pork from the thighs or other-thighs that is not too fat. Chop it small and then add salt, pepper-powder, and fennel-seed. Then mix with the other and then fill in the intestine-sausage-casings and then hang to dry on the rack.


74. How to make liver- and blood-sausages.

74a Take white-bread with sweet-milk, six eggs, mace, pepper, cloves, ginger, and nutmeg. Mix together with the pounded strained liver and then fill in the intestine-sausage-casings with the caul however fill not too stiff so that it does not leak out.

74b Blood-sausages one also makes all thus, however it should taste mostly of the mace and take also onion small-chopped and fry that in the butter and put that also with the blood and much fat therein. Make as above.


75. How to make small-rolls or small-balls of flesh.

Take pork of the thighs or other-thighs, boil very tender, then remove the flesh and fat and pound very small in a mortar and put therein four or five raw egg yolks. Put therewith cinnamon, ginger, some clove-powder, the most of galingale, some saffron, and sugar. Mix this all together and make here small-balls the size of egg yolks. Then take white wine and crumbs of white-bread put therein and set together on the fire. Let soak and put therewith galingale, ginger, cinnamon, some saffron, and sugar. Then put together through a sieve that is appropriately thick and leave to boil in together. Then add the small-balls and leave to boil a bit with and then serve additionally warm to the tables, five or six in a dish.


76. How to make old flesh tender.

Take old flesh or an old hen or an old bird, rub it with garlic and then put it in the pot and it shall thus become as tender as a chicken. However if you wish to have it done very quickly, so put also in the pot a piece of steel or glass and take a wet cloth and stop the pot tight covered and leave so to boil.


77. How to make trimolette of partridges.

Take the partridges, make clean and remove the intestine. Wash clean, then take a handful of whole pepper, put that in the partridge and then do or skewer the opening closed again and take a half pint of Rhenish wine and also clean water. Boil the partridge in the pot over the fire and stop the pot tight covered so that the air [=steam] does not fly out, and when it is done, so serve to the tables with the broth wherein it is boiled. The broth is very good drunk, it comforts the stomach, the head and all the members.


78. How to make a sauce on a broiled or boiled partridge.

Take white-bread soaked in vinegar and then put through a sieve. Then put therewith ginger, cinnamon, sugar, a bit of pepper, and some wine, some saffron to make colour or turnsole if you wish. Boil together, then put on the partridge and serve.


Nota: Item all sauces that one does through the sieve, one should stick through hot to go through better.


79. How to braise a capon with orange-peels.

Take the capon, roast it almost tender, then pull it on the spit and take orange-peels sliced in quarters, boil it in water [until] tender. Then take Rhenish wine in a clean pot and put the orange-peels therein and sugar until it is sweet enough. Then put the capon therewith, leave together to stew until it is enough. Then put the capon in the dish and pour the peels with the broth thereover, sprinkle thereon cinnamon and serve to the tables.


80. How to prepare a capon with oranges.

Take three or four oranges, peel, cut them in slices and take the fat of the capon, chop it small and stick it with the apples in the capon and if there is no fat, so take butter instead of fat. Leave it to broil and baste it well. Now when it is broiled, so take the butter with which it was basted and put that in a dish, put therewith a half cruse of bastard [wine] or malmsey and put therewith the juice of five or six oranges. Leave together to become hot. Then cut sops of white-bread in a dish and dismember your capon thereon. Pour your broth thereover and serve so to the tables.


81. How to make a caudle for veal or hens.

Take hard-boiled egg yolks and crush very small with white-bread. Put through a sieve with Rhenish wine and put therewith sugar with ginger and if you wish, also put therewith some saffron. Leave together to boil and as your hens are cooked tender, so pour thereon this broth and serve to the tables.


82. How to make a cameline sauce that one serves on many pasties of hens and broiled flesh.

Take sliced white-bread roasted on a roaster without burning, then soak in warm wine with turnsole, then put together through a sieve. Then add sugar, cinnamon, and leave together to boil until it is a bit thickish and then pour on your food and serve to the tables.


83. How one shall properly broil a capon.

Take the capon, make it very clean and take the "remmelen" [?] of beef-flesh sliced just like flesh for pasties and take bone-marrow, ginger, cinnamon, raisins, and some saffron and stick this together in the capon. Leave this to broil well, baste it well and take wine and some water, ginger, cinnamon, and the fat from the pans. Leave this together to boil well and then pour on the capon and serve to the tables.


84. How to make a capon with blanc-manger.

Take the capon, boil it in hotchpotch-broth very white and tender. Then take peeled almonds, crush very small. Take some of the whitest bread and soak in the broth in which the capon is boiled. Put herewith white ginger and Rhenish wine, put it together through the sieve with the crushed almonds, then leave together to boil and then pour on the capon and serve to the tables.


85. How to broil a capon in the Spanish [manner].

Take a half pound of raisins and as much fresh bacon as you please and as much garlic as you wish. Chop it together with the bacon very small, then mix with the raisins and stick it together in the capon. Then stick the capon on the spit and baste it well with butter [while roasting?] and serve to the tables.


86. How to stew a capon.

Take the capon, boil it tender and then cut it apart. Put white-bread in its broth and crush therewith some almonds. Then put together through a sieve and then put therewith good wine, four or five egg yolks small-beaten, ginger, cinnamon, sugar, and bone-marrow. Leave this together with the capon to stew and then serve to the tables. Also you might take crumbs of white-bread in its own broth, wine, verjuice, fresh butter, mace, ginger. Leave the capon herewith to stew and then serve it. You might also stew herewith veal or wether-hotchpotch.


87. How to make a boiled capon with blanc-manger.

Take the capon, boil it tender in wether-broth, then take almonds, crush very small and take crumbs of the cleanest white-bread and soak in the broth of the capon. Take white peeled ginger and white wine, put together through a sieve. Leave to boil and then put on the boiled capon and serve it to the tables.


88. How to make a "Bartange" [name of sauce] sauce on a boiled capon.

Take four ounces of almonds peeled and small-crushed with crumbs of white-bread. Then take the juice of six or seven oranges and with the almonds with white wine put through a sieve and put therein sugar, leave this to boil. Then pour on the warm boiled capon, sprinkle thereover pine nut kernels and serve. This all is also good for a hen.


89. How to make sauce for boiled hens.

Take egg yolks hard boiled, lay to soak with white-bread in Rhenish wine and put herewith sugar and verjuice, a bit of vinegar and some saffron. Put it together through a sieve and then leave together to boil. Then pour on warm boiled hens and serve to the tables. Take for each hen five yolks.


90. How to make sauce for broiled hens.

Take raisins, pound small, put through a sieve with white wine or Ptuj [wine] and take also almonds. Put also through a sieve with Ptuj [wine] small-pounded, however you should have more raisins than almonds. It should also be thickly strained. Put herewith cinnamon and sugar as much as you please. Leave together to boil until it is thick. Then pour on the broiled hens and serve.


91. How to make "Fuleet" [name of soup] soup.

Take hens or veal for hotchpotch boiled tender. Finely-chop, then take white-bread broiled red and not black on the roaster and lay to soak in the same broth. Put it through [a sieve] and then put with the flesh and then put therewith also some wine, ginger, grains of paradise, and some saffron. Leave together to stew a bit; at the last some verjuice and as you dress it on if you wish, so chop-up some parsley. Put in the pot, dress on and serve.


92. To make a "Saude" [name of sauce] sauce to put on a tongue, also well in a pasty.

Take a boiled oxen-tongue, stick therein cloves, then fry it not too much in the butter. Take white-bread, roast it brown on a roaster, lay to soak in red wine with vinegar and then put therewith with spice-powder and put together through a sieve and leave to boil in a small-pan. Pour on the roasted tongue and serve.


93. How to make a saupiquet for rabbits.

Take red roasted white-bread, soak in red wine with some vinegar, put through a sieve and then put therewith much sugar, made spice-powder, butter from the pans and leave together to boil. Then pour on a broiled rabbit and serve.


94. To make must-sauce on broiled hens.

Take red wine, make it violet-colour with turnsole and put therein roasted white-bread. Leave to soak. Then put through a sieve. Then put therewith sugar and ginger. Leave this together to boil. Then pour on broiled hens and sprinkle thereon white hard-sugar and serve to the tables.


95. How to make cameline sauce for all roasted [meat].

Take red wine, make it violet-colour with turnsole and put therewith some vinegar and add roasted white-bread. Leave to soak and put together through a sieve. Then put therewith cinnamon, sugar, ginger and leave together to boil. Pour there what you want on it and serve.


96. To make a sauce for boiled rabbits.

Take peeled almonds, crush very small with crumbs of white-bread and put through a sieve with white wine. Then put therewith ginger, mace, and some clove-powder. Leave this together to boil and then pour over tender boiled rabbits broken in pieces and serve.


97. To make a sauce on a hare.

Take the hare, cleave it and roast it half enough on a roaster and then take it off, break it in pieces, set it to stew in hotchpotch-broth until it is tender. Then take roasted white-bread and soak in wether-broth. Then put through a sieve with white wine and some vinegar and then put therewith ginger, cinnamon, mace with some clove-powder, and leave together to boil with roast-fat from the pans and then take the hare out of the broth in which it is braised and put it in a dish. Put this broth on and serve it to the tables.


98. How to make saupiquet on broiled rabbits.

Take roasted white-bread, soak in hotchpotch-broth and wring together through a sieve with red wine. Then put therewith sugar, cinnamon, ginger, mace, and some clove-powder. Leave this together to boil and then roast some onions in butter. Put with the other, then leave together to boil until it is thick. Then put on the broiled rabbits and serve.


99. How to make Doornik sauce on a broiled capon.

Take red wine, colour it with turnsole and put therewith some vinegar, lay therein roasted white-bread to soak and then put therewith cinnamon, sugar, ginger, and a bit of galingale. Leave this together to boil and put therewith in the boiling [sauce] bone-marrow in pieces sliced equally a half finger long and a finger thick. Leave this together to boil for a small-period. Then pour on a broiled capon and leave thereon a bit to cool and then sprinkle thereover candied caraway-seed, serve to the tables on that it does not melt. In this sauce one does also juice of oranges.


100. How to make must-sauce to pour over broiled hens.

Take red redcurrant-berries and put that through a sieve. Put therewith egg yolks small-beaten and sugar until it is as sweet as you want. Boil this together just as one boils an omelette Lombardy and then put over broiled hens or also one dresses it just as one does an omelette Lombardy.


101. How to make sauce of oranges for braised pears.

101a Take fresh peels of oranges, however not too many, it would otherwise be bitter and boil it soft in Rhenish wine with crumbs of white-bread. Then rub through a sieve and then take the peeled oranges, cut them in round slices and put this with strained broth in a pot and much sugar. Leave together to boil until it begins to thicken. This one dresses in small-dishes.

101b Also one does it over braised pears, thus braised. Take a tanned pot and leave therein butter to become hot until it is boiling and then set therein peeled pears. Leave therein to stew until it is enough. Leave the stalks therein and the pears should be covered over with the butter. When that it is enough take out the butter, set in a dish and pour there this suggested sauce and serve to the table.


102. How to make eggs the one half white and the other half violet-colour.

Take eggs and blow the eggs out of the shells. Fill the half with thick-sugar-syrup, then leave to become cold. Then fill also the shells with empurpled thick-sugar-syrup. Leave to become cold, peel the shells off and serve the eggs.


103. How to prepare oxen-feet.

Take the feet, boil them very tender and then cut them afterwards and lay a day or two in the vinegar and then roast them on a roaster, then put therewith butter, vinegar, sugar, cinnamon, and some ginger and leave this together to boil. Then lay therein the feet and leave together to stew until the broth is a bit thickened. Then place on and sprinkle thereover some ginger.


104. To make a sauce to serve on flesh.

Take wether-broth, a bit of saffron, ginger-powder, butter, and verjuice. Leave this together to boil, put crumbs of white-bread in egg yolks, beat it well together and then stir it in the broth. Leave together to boil until it is enough and put on flesh or in dishes and serve.


105. How to stew oxen-feet.

Take the feet when they are boiled tender. Do [=cut] in two and put in a pot. Put therewith fresh broth, some butter, verjuice, some wine-vinegar, and sugar so that it is not too sweet, ginger, currants, bay laurel leaves. Leave this to stand together moderately to stew so that it is not too thick or too thin. When it is enough, dress it on and sprinkle thereover cinnamon.


106. How to prepare pig's-feet.

Take the feet and roast them on a roaster. When they are cooked, then put in a pot and put therewith wine, sugar, ginger, and a bit of saffron with peeled oranges sliced in round slices, some butter, if you wish. Leave this together to stew gently, so that it is not too unreduced or too reduced. Then dress it on and serve.


107. How to make sauce for many [kinds of] flesh.

Take roasted white-bread with wether-broth and some vinegar, put through a sieve. Take small-sliced bacon with onion with good chopped-up green herbs. Boil together and put over your flesh and serve.


108. How to make sauce for a hare.

Take sweet-cherry-herbs not strained. When one first makes it, rub with wine through a sieve with a bit of vinegar and put therewith sugar, cinnamon, and cloves, and some fat from the pans if you wish and leave to boil until it is a bit thick. Then pour on and serve. Also take roasted white-bread strained with wine, then put therewith sugar, cloves, ginger or some pepper, some fat from the pans, if you wish it. Leave this together to boil until it is enough and then pour over the roasted [meat] and serve. This one serves for many roasted [meats].


109. Green sauce over boiled or broiled fish or flesh

Take crumbs of rye-bread boiled in good vinegar, leave to become cold and then put together through a sieve. Put there butter, ginger, and a bit of salt and leave together to boil, then pour over the food you want it on. Then take the juice of green pounded "coren" [?] or sorrel and pour therewith as much until it is as green as you want and serve. You might also set this sauce in small-saucers.


110. How to make sauce on a pig's-hotchpotch

Take raw pork, broil very black on a roaster and then remove. Cut in pieces as large as it pleases you and then take flesh-broth or clean water and put therewith vinegar, some salt, red wine, pepper, cinnamon, cloves. Leave together to boil, then add your broiled flesh and leave together to stew until it is enough and serve.


111. How to cook a boiled suckling-pig or [how] one heats "leversael" [liver-something ?].

Take a suckling-pig, boil in half wine and half water and a reasonable amount of mace. Leave together to boil until it is enough, then take your pig out of the broth and lay in a dish and add the warm broth, eight or nine egg yolks small-beaten and two or three small-sliced white-breads. Put it together through a sieve and then put therewith ginger, saffron and bit of wine-vinegar. Leave together to boil and then leave to become cold. Then pour over the pig and serve cold.


112. How to make a sauce, filling or souse for a broiled suckling-pig.

Take apples, peel and crush small in a mortar and put in a pot with butter, put therewith currants, ginger, cinnamon, mace, some cloves, sugar, and saffron. Pound peeled almonds very small and put also in the pot with all the other. Then leave together to boil until you think that it is enough. Then put in a dish and then lay there on top of the broiled pig, whether it is whole or half or quartered as it pleases you and serve, however lay with the skin upwards.


113. How to make sauce on a brawn of pigs, small or large.

113a Take the brawn of the pigs as small-sliced as you please, boil tender and leave to become cold. Take white wine and verjuice and lay therein crumbs of the whitest white-bread to soak. Pound peeled almonds very small and put it together through a sieve. Put therewith white sugar, leave together to boil and then put cold on the cold brawn and serve.

113b Another manner. Take white wine, three or four hard-boiled egg yolks, therein red roasted white-bread and verjuice. Put this together through a sieve, put therewith sugar and saffron, leave this together to boil and to become cold and put on the cold brawn and so served.

113c Now in another manner how to serve hot. Take red roasted white-bread, soak in fresh beef-broth, white wine, and verjuice. Put together through a sieve, then put therewith ginger, nutmeg or mace, sugar, saffron, and some cloves. Leave together to boil. So poured hot over the hot fresh boiled brawn and so served.


114. How to make a "Combe" [kind of cumin sauce] sauce on a suckling-pig.

Take the suckling-pig as small-hewed as you please, boil tender in water and some salt. When it is done thus remove the broth and leave to become cold. Then take white wine and a bit of vinegar, lay therein to soak crumbs of white-bread and hard-boiled egg yolks. Then put it through a sieve. Then put therewith ginger, saffron, sugar, and a good bit of cumin to have a small small-taste [of cumin]. Leave this together to boil and to become cold and then poured cold over the cold brawn and served.


115. How to make galantine for eel and other food.

115a Take the thickest eel that you can obtain, scald the slime well off in the water, remove the fins, then cleave it open and pull the fish-bones out and cut it in three or four pieces. Roll each piece the fish-side outside, tie so with a string. Then take red wine that is empurpled with turnsole, add isinglass to thicken and boil the eel therein until it is enough. Then remove the eel. Leave it to dry, then roast the white-bread red on a roaster and lay to soak in the wine that the eel was boiled in. Put together through a sieve, put therewith ginger, cinnamon, mace or nutmeg, cloves, and galingale, of each the same amount, and a little of grains of paradise, and much sugar. Leave together to boil until it thickens, then take from the fire and push it so hot through a sieve. Then pour it on the eel and as you serve it, lay a piece in a dish, put thereon lots of sauce and sprinkle thereon this powder very thickly and serve, however make [sure] that it tastes of the galingale.

115b For proper galantine: three jars of Rhenish wine, galingale, grains of paradise, nutmeg of each a quarter-part of a half-ounce, a half-ounce of ginger, four ounces of fine sugar, a half half-ounce of saffron, and three half-ounces of isinglass. Leave this together to boil until it thickens and then push hot through a sieve and so put on the food.


116. How to make galantine on a capon or suckling-pig, feet or ears of pigs.

Take the capon, pig, feet or ears of the pigs and boil in water half enough. Then put therewith a jar of Rhenish wine and some isinglass, however scoop first the fat clean off and colour it with turnsole. Put therewith some wine-vinegar and ginger, grains of paradise, and other spices, if you wish and leave in front of [the fire] to boil until it is enough. Then take the flesh out and pour the liquid two or three-times through the sack, leave the broth to sink to wash [it] clear before you pour it through, pour hot through [a sieve] and leave what you pour through thus leave to become cold and then serve.


117. How to prepare lobsters or crabs.

Take two parts of water and one part of wine-vinegar, salt it well, boil it an hour long and it should first boil before one throws them therein. Then serve dry.


118. How to make a sauce for mussels.

Take and boil the mussels as befits and take butter, verjuice, two or three egg yolks small-beaten, and ginger, leave this together to boil and dress it in small-saucers and serve with the mussels to the tables. If you wish, you might also put therewith some of the same broth that the mussels were boiled in, you might also pour it over the mussels, if you wish.


119. How to prepare sea-cock [piper gurnard or lumpfish].

Take the sea-cock, salt it appropriately, boil it appropriately and then remove it from the water, leave it to become cold and heat it through in a pan with butter, then put therewith vinegar and mustard. Roast together in a lot of liquid, however do not leave it to become rosy, then serve. This is very good, sprinkle thereover ginger.


120. How to prepare gudgeons with the broth.

Take Rhenish wine, some water and some salt, some ginger, fresh butter, stuff the gudgeons herein. When it is enough, so put therewith some green chopped-up flesh-herbs, leave to boil once, thereafter roast white-bread, lay under in the dish and dress the gudgeons with the broth on and serve.


121. How to prepare freshwater lampreys and saltwater lampreys, boiled or broiled.

121a Take the freshwater lampreys and roast them on a spit half enough, then pull them off and put in red wine and set on the fire until it is enough. Then lay out, leave to dry and roast white-bread so that it is red. Thereafter lay to soak in the same wine that these freshwater lampreys were boiled in and put therewith cinnamon, ginger, cloves, mace, galingale, and sugar, the taste should be of the galingale. Put it together through a sieve, leave to boil and then pour hot over the hot freshwater lampreys and serve.

121b Additionally how to broil and to prepare saltwater lampreys. Lay in a basin with bastard [wine] and leave in that [live] to drink until it is very thick. Then take a long pin and prick it in the ears and all the body through, so that the blood comes into the bastard [wine]. Then stick the saltwater lamprey entirely on a spit just as for a snake, put in the wine cinnamon, ginger, and some butter and leave this together to boil and baste the saltwater lamprey herewith until it is broiled enough. Thereafter lay in a dish and put thereover its own broth, wherewith it is basted and serve to the table.

121c Now in another manner. Drown the saltwater lamprey first in a jar of Rhenish wine, then scald it in clean water and stick it with a skewer in the ear so that the sweat or blood streams into the wine. Then cut it in pieces, salt it and leave to dry on a roaster on the fire. Then put the pieces in the wine wherein it is killed and put therewith cloves, ginger, cinnamon, currants, butter, and sugar. Leave together to boil until it is enough, then dress it on and serve to the tables. The freshwater lampreys do not leave to drown, however make [them] clean, prepare them just as this last saltwater lamprey was prepared and serve.


122. How to stew or to braise a head of a salmon.

Take the head and hew it just as for hotchpotch. Boil well and cut apart, then put therewith currants, ginger, rosemary, wine, and some vinegar. Leave together to stew until it is enough, then dress it on and serve, now or stuff it properly solely with some ginger-powder and at the last some green chopped-up parsley and as you push it out so add some vinegar. Dress it on and serve it to the table.


123. To make a sauce on boiled bream.

Take white-bread, soak in Rhenish wine with some vinegar and hard-boiled egg yolks. Put it through a sieve. Put therewith cumin, ginger; the taste should be of the cumin. Leave together to boil and pour over the boiled bream and serve on, however the bream should be peeled before one does it in the dish, just as one peels the bass.


124. A sauce to make over a broiled bream.

Take red roasted white-bread, soak in red wine, then put therewith currants, cinnamon, ginger, and some butter. Leave this together to boil and then pour over the broiled bream and serve it.


125. A sauce to make for cod.

Take red roasted white-bread, soak in red wine, add sugar, cinnamon, and ginger and boil in a earthen pot, set it therein beside [the code] and use thereof as you wish on your fish.


126. How to cook heads of cod.

Take the heads, make clean and boil them tender, then remove and cut them just like "penskens" [fish ?]. Then chop up onion small, put it in a small-pot with butter or burnt oil and leave therein to boil soft. Then add your sliced heads, put therewith some vinegar and grains-of-paradise-powder, leave all to stew gently. Then dress it on and sprinkle thereon ginger.


127. How to make minced-meat of fish or with the stirred eggs.

Take fresh sea-fish, boil it and chop it very small and fry in white butter not brown. Then take beaten eggs, add some saffron and some ginger and stir together with the fish in the pan and serve to the table.


128. How to make pottage of carp.

Take the carp, cut it as you wish and fry the onion in butter, put that in the pot with the butter and put therewith wine, salt, and vinegar, you might to put therewith also many spices. Leave the carp to stew until it is enough and serve it with unreduced broth.


129. How to stew a carp.

129a Take a carp, kill it and leave it to stand a bit in its own blood, then put it on the fire in Rhenish wine with some butter, cloves, pepper, and nutmeg, leave this to stew. Then set a white-bread roasted brown to soak, pass it through a sieve and then put it in the pot with the carp and leave together to stew until it is enough and then serve.

129b Another manner. Take the carp and cleave it, remove the gall-bladder and leave it all its intestine, leave it also in its blood and take a earthen pot that is flat on the bottom. Lay on the bottom bay laurel leaves and then lay a layer of carp with the scales underneath. Then take two white onions small-sliced and cooked soft in the butter and then with the carp put ten or twelve whole-cloves a bit broken, nutmeg-powder and pepper-powder, two cruse of beer, a cruse of wine, a half cruse of vinegar. Put this all together in the pot with the carp and stop the pot tight covered and leave so to stand to stew on a small coal-fire until it is enough and serve it.


130. Sauce on a broiled carp.

Take roasted white-bread, soak in red wine. Then put it through a sieve, put therewith butter, ginger, cloves, grains of paradise, saffron, and some vinegar. Leave this together to boil and pour warm over the broiled carp and serve it to the table.


131. Sauce on a boiled carp.

Take Rhenish wine, butter, ginger, cinnamon, saffron and sugar, let this come to a boil and so poured warm over the boiled carp and served.


132. How to make hotchpotch of sturgeon.

Take the sturgeon, boil it a half hour in red wine and vinegar, then cut it apart and set it to stew in the same broth with some ginger, mace, and cloves. Then chop-up some green fennel, sage, rosemary, and hyssop and some fresh butter. Leave together to stew until it is enough. Then dress it and serve.


133. Sauce on broiled pikes.

133a Take roasted white-bread, soak in red wine. Put it through a sieve, then put therewith some butter, ginger, cinnamon, and sugar, leave together to boil. Pour over the broiled pike. Serve it warm.

133b In another manner. Take peeled almonds, crush small and put through a sieve with verjuice. Then put therewith ginger and sugar. Boil together. Serve warm on the warm broiled pike.


134. Sauce on a boiled pike.

Take the pike, boil it in clean water, peel it. Then take peeled almonds, crush small and take crumbs of white-bread soaked in Rhenish wine. Thereafter put it with the almonds through a sieve and sugar it, so that it pleases you. Thus add ginger and leave together to boil. Thereafter put on the peeled warm pike and serve.


135. To boil a pike in the Dutch [manner].

Take the pike, kill it while living, leave the head whole and wash it clean. Lay it immediately in wine-vinegar or other strong vinegar. Hang a boiler of well salted water over the fire, leave it therein to come to the boil, then immediately add the pike with the vinegar. Leave it to boil strongly and skim it clean and then put it hot without broth in a dish and serve it hot. Set vinegar and ginger in small-saucers for sauce or if you wish, so might you make other sauce. Take wine, sugar, cinnamon, ginger, and saffron, leave together to boil and set it in small-saucers or pour on the pike. Serve to the table.


136. Sauce for all broiled fish.

Take an apple small-sliced, put that in a small-pan with butter, wine, currants, sugar, ginger, and cinnamon. Leave this all together to boil well and so put on the broiled fish.


137. To boil a pike in the Spanish [manner].

Take lemons sliced in slices, put that in a pitcher with wine, water, butter, ginger, saffron, and cloves. Leave this together to stew until it is enough, then put it in a dish and lay therein the boiled pike and serve it hot to the table.


138. How to stew a pike.

Take the pike, cut it in pieces, wash it clean and sprinkle thereover some salt. Take two or three onions sliced in slices and boil them first in clean water and then add your pike. Thereafter add a large spoon full of puree of peas, that is thick pea or strained pea, made thin just like broth, verjuice, fresh butter, whole pepper, and mace, ginger-powder or whole. Leave together to stew until it is enough. Then serve on, make the broth as dilute as you want.


139. How to keep eggs very well for a half year.

Take fresh eggs and set with the sharp [ends] upwards in clean linen-cloth and cover with clean linen-cloth. So will remain fresh and good.


140. How to boil eggs in the shells so that they do not become hard.

When the eggs in the boiler or pot have been over the fire a bit so that they are quickly hot, so take a spoon and stir with the eggs, leave so to boil. One says that they do not become hard.


141. How to carry a carp over land so that it remains living.

Take a crumb of rye-bread and lay in Rhenish wine, stick the liquid in the mouth [of the carp] and carry it thus where you wish without dying.


142. How to prepare partridges and snipes and how to "kennen" [know ?].

When one broils partridges if you wishes, one does not wash the partridges. When the intestine is pulled out, then one sticks it thus successfully on the spit, however if it is not fresh so you might wash it. When the partridges have blackish beaks and yellowish feet, they are young. The snipes one roasts with the innards and when they are almost half broiled, so lay roasted white-bread in the pan under the snipes and leave the innards to drip thereon and when it is enough then one lays this bread in the dish and lays the snipes there on top and serves.


143. How to kill and additionally to prepare a roast-pig.

143a Take the two rear legs of the pig between your own legs as you kill it and take the mouth in your hand and thus cut the throat open and leave to bleed well. Then lay it in front of the fire so that it does not become too cold until your water is hot enough to scald. Thus stick the tail first in the boiler and get the hair off, then stick the pig whole in the boiler, however watch that the water is not too hot or very much skin would go off with it and when it is clean-scalded, then cut open in the middle and remove the intestine completely and wash it clean and fill with green parsley, cloves, thyme, basil, and rosemary. Leave these herbs in a small-boiler to boil in clean water or to soak in warm water. Then crush them very small in a mortar with two hard-boiled eggs and a good slice of butter. When it is small-crushed, put therewith cloves, pepper, sugar, and currants, mix together with the herbs and fill in the pig and stick it on the spit. Leave to broil well, baste well with butter and with the drippings that drips thereoff -- you should leave the ears, tail and feet all on the pig -- the front feet should stick on the neck, the small-tail on the body between the "velleken" [?], the two rear feet stick out [straight back?] just as for a hare. One fills the roast-pig thus as long as the herbs are green, however in the winter take dried herbs and powder it and put therewith powdered mace, pepper, and cloves and rub therewith on the inside of the pig and then fill with peeled chestnuts and stick it thus on the spit and when it has broiled a bit, stick in the pig's skin whole cloves and leave additionally to broil.

143b A red sauce for the same roasted [pig]. Take black roasted white-bread, soak in Rhenish wine and a bit of vinegar, then put it through a sieve and put therewith cinnamon, ginger, sugar, and fat from the pan and carrots, the cores removed. Leave together to boil until it is thickened. Also pour over the roasted [meat] or dress it on in small small-dishes with the roasted [meat] and serve. This sauce put also over a broiled goose or duck.


144. Now a brown sauce over the same roasted [pig] on the other side.

Take brown butter and fat from the pan, leave to become very hot with some vinegar, pepper, clove-powder, and sugar. Leave together to boil and beat it well until it is thickened. Then put it over the roasted [pig].


145. A sauce over a broiled hare, rabbit, calf's-rib, haslet, or beef-flesh.

Take a slice of butter, a half rummer of vinegar, a rummer of wine, pepper, clove-powder, and sugar. Leave this together to boil until it thickens. Then put it over the roasted [meat] and serve.


146. How to prepare a hare.

When you have removed the skin of the hare -- if it is fresh -- rub it on the outside with its liver and leave that a while to dry, however if it is not fresh, thus you dare not rub it and when it is fresh the skin is removed, so might you stick it very immediately on the spit when it is clean washed inside and first baste the hare well with vinegar and leave the vinegar well in to dry so it is short [?]. Thereafter then pour vinegar again from the pan and baste it additionally with butter because it would be softer. You might therein also stick sausages or chestnuts and leave to broil with. Thus might you broil also rabbits, however that might you not rub with the blood, because it should be white for broiling and if you wish to keep some hare, rabbit, or some other flesh, so should it be scalded, to wit: you should boil a good half hour in clean water and clean-skim and then lay in the vinegar and when it is scalded and cold then you might lard [it]. Flesh that is not wholly fresh, you might also scald in water and some vinegar.


147. To make a pepper-sauce on a broiled hare, rabbit or other flesh.

Take four or five slices of black roasted rye- or wheat-bread and soak in bastard [wine]. Thereafter put it through a sieve and add much pepper and clove-powder. Leave this together to boil until it is thick enough and then put it on the roasted [meat]. In this pepper-sauce one stuffs also a hare, however one breaks it in pieces. This pepper-sauce one also does over beef-flesh.


148. Now a pepper-sauce for all wild-roast, hare or swan.

Take black roasted rye-bread, soak in bastard [wine] or Rhenish wine, and some vinegar. Then put it through a sieve, put therewith cinnamon, pepper, cloves, mace or nutmeg all powdered, saffron, and much sugar. Leave this together to boil until it is thick enough, stir well and put it thereon if you want.


149. How to make pepper-sauce on fresh broiled beef-flesh.

Take roasted white-bread and soak in thin flesh-broth. Then pass it through a sieve with a bit of vinegar. Then put therewith some saffron and pepper-powder and leave together to boil [until] thick. Thereafter pour over your roasted [meat]. You might put therewith also a good bit of sugar, if that pleases you.


150. A sauce to make for broiled rabbits or ducks.

Take roasted white-bread, lay to soak in red wine, thereafter pass it through a sieve so that it is dilute broth. Then put therewith ginger and cinnamon-powder and leave to boil until it is thick and if you wish it, so put therewith fat from the pan or butter and pepper and clove-powder to make it brown.


151. A sauce to make for young-rabbit.

Take wine, ginger, currants, and saffron and if you want it, some fat from the pan or butter, peeled almonds sliced in small pieces. This boiled together until you think that it is enough and therewith some dilute broth. This put over the roasted [meat] and so served.


152. A very good sauce to make for young-rabbits and rabbits in the English manner.

Take verjuice, butter, and sugar until it is sweet enough. Leave together a while to boil in a dish in a coffer. Then put therewith four or five small-spoons juice of crushed sorrel that is crushed with a crumb of rye-bread, put therewith also some ginger, then leave now a while to boil and take also four or five small-slices of white-bread unroasted, lay in the dish in the broth and sprinkle thereon much cinnamon-powder and leave now a bit to boil and then lay thereon the roasted [meat], however make sure that it is always a somewhat unreduced broth and serve to the table.


153. How to stew a very excellent duck with the herbs.

Take the bird when the intestine is out and is washed, then boil it in clean water with some salt, clean-skimmed until half [cooked], thereafter cut it apart and put in a clean pot with its own broth or wether-broth without fat with a good slice of butter and fill in the bird an onion, parsley, rosemary, cloves, and thyme all small-chopped-up and some bacon small-sliced. Put this together in the bird and pour in the bird also some vinegar and then lay it in the broth to boil. Thereafter put in a fine small-cloth ginger, pepper, mace, and cloves, tight covered and throw in the pot. Then leave together to stew until it is enough. If you wish to have it sweet, so put some sugar in the broth and as you dress it on so lay the spices all whole in the dish on the bird. Cut the ginger in round small-slices and lay it on the rim of the dish and serve it to the table. The swan you might also stew thus and thus you take butter, if you have no bacon to take.


154. How to stew a duck or swan very excellent.

Take the bird clean-made and washed, boil it with some salt until half [cooked], well skimmed. When it is boiled enough, so cut it apart and take some of the same broth without the fat with a good slice of butter and much pepper-powder, a onion or two sliced in round slices, thereafter take dried flesh-herbs, to wit: thyme, rosemary, marjoram, and basil. Tie this in a small-cloth and put it in the pot, leave together to boil until the onion is enough. Thereafter lay therein the bird and leave to stew until it is almost enough. Then put therewith some vinegar and sugar, as sweet as you think good and leave together now a bit to stew. Then dress the bird on and sprinkle thereon cinnamon-powder or clove-powder and serve it to the table. One sticks therein also cloves.


155. A sauce or souse for broiled ducks or swan.

Take two or three apples small-chopped or sliced and take thereto of the fat from the pan and ginger or pepper and much sugar and some vinegar. Leave this together to boil until it is enough. Thereafter put it on the roasted [meat] and serve to the tables.


156. How to make sauce or pepper-sauce on broiled ducks or swan.

Take wether-broth and two onions, boil together so that the strength in the broth is of the onion. Then throw the onion out and roast white-bread reddish and lay to soak in Rhenish wine, pass it through a sieve with the broth and the wine and a bit of vinegar. Then put therewith pepper and clove-powder and leave together to boil until it is enough, however therewith should be as much sugar until you think that it is sweet enough and if you want it coloured, so add saffron or turnsole or boil therein a piece of carrot, the core removed. Then pour on the roasted [meat] and serve.


157. To stew a hotchpotch of venison.

One shall boil the hotchpotch as other flesh and take half bastard [wine] and half of the broth that the venison is boiled in and put therewith much clove-powder and currants. Leave this together with the boiled venison to stew until it is enough. Then serve to the tables.


158. How to stew venison-hotchpotch of pork.

Take fresh pig's-bacon of the thinnest part of the belly, salt it, skim it just as for other flesh. Leave to boil until it is enough. Then take roasted rye-bread and lay to soak in bastard [wine]. Pass it through a sieve, then put therewith pepper, clove-powder, and some Rhenish wine and leave together to stew with the flesh until it is enough. Then serve to the tables.


159. How to broil a haslet of wild pigs.

Take the haslet and scald it in half water and vinegar and then leave it to become cold. Then roast it and roast white-bread very brown, lay to soak in Rhenish wine and vinegar and then pass it together through a sieve. Then put therewith pepper, clove-powder, saffron, and some sugar, however make it not too sweet because it should be sour and put therewith some lard-bacon small-sliced. Leave together to boil until you think that it is enough, then dress it on small small-dishes and serve to the table.


160. How to broil a filled goose and how to make sauces thereto.

160a Take for the filling parsley, thyme, basil, marjoram, rosemary, some noble sage and this chopped up coarsely, and an onion or two sliced in five or six pieces or garlic if you wish, if you want it you dare to put therein no garlic or no onion and fill in the goose and stick the opening closed. Stick it on the spit and leave to roast. When it is half broiled, so might you stick whole cloves in here and there, or if you wish, you might fill the goose with noble flesh-herbs, onion, and apples.

160b Additionally to make a sauce for the broiled goose, take roast-fat from the pans and put therewith vinegar and pepper, cloves, mace, and some cinnamon all powdered, some sugar. Leave this together to boil until it is enough and as the roasted [meat] lies in the dish, so pour thereover and serve to the tables.

160c Another sauce. Take a small-handful of chives, a small-handful of parsley and crush together and put with broth through a sieve. Put the broth in a small-pan. Put herewith some fat from the pans and much ginger-powder. Leave this together to boil well and as you wish to dress it, so add some vinegar and stir well and pour over the goose or set it in small small-dishes and serve. Do not make it boil with the vinegar so that the sauce does not become weak.

160d Now another sauce. Take a crumb of white-bread and lay to soak in cream of sweet-milk. Take some noble sage, crush that very small and take three or four hard-boiled eggs. Crush them very small and take three or four hard-boiled eggs, crush them very small with the sage and then put therewith also the soaked crumb of white-bread and crush it together very small. Then rub through a sieve with the cream. Thereafter put it in a small-pan and put therewith some fats from the pans and ginger-powder and some sugar and stir well together and leave together to boil until you to think good. And when the goose is enough, so lay in a dish and put thereon this broth and serve to the table.


161. A sauce on a broiled shoulder.

Take of the fat from the pans and put it in a small-pan and put therewith elderflower-vinegar and much pepper-powder and some sugar and leave this together to boil and pour also over the roasted [meat]. If you have a broiled behind-shoulder and want to chop some of the roasted [meat], so put it in the small-broth that streamed out of the roasted [meat] streamed on the table in the same dish and put therewith some elderflower-vinegar and some powdered nutmeg and place so in a coffer with fire and leave thus together to boil and it is ready and very good.


162. How to stew a hotchpotch of everything.

Take a capon, wether-flesh, beef-flesh, and pork of each as much as you think good, a small-swan or duck, the feet, ears and the tail of the pork, and also sausages. This put all together in a pot on the fire, appropriately salted and clean-skimmed, boiled very tender. Then cut it apart and set it lengthwise in the broth to stew with ginger and pepper-powder and put herewith Savoy cabbages that are first boiled soft. Leave this all together to stew in a pot and as it is braised enough, dress it on and serve to the tables.


163. How to stew a Cologne-style hotchpotch.

Take beef-flesh of the best that is on the ox to wit: of the loose rib or short rib and a piece of the muscle [thigh?] and put it over the fire, appropriately salted and skimmed and as it boils so add two or three whole onions and a small-bunch of dried dill-stalks and take two or three claws of ginger, three or four petals of mace, and a handful of whole pepper. Tie this together in a fine small-cloth, throw also in the pot and leave together to boil until it is enough. Then cut it apart and throw the onion aside and set it with its own broth to stew in a clean pot, put therewith the small-cloth with the whole herbs and the dill-stalks also in the pot. Leave together to stew until it is enough. Then dress the hotchpotch evenly laid in the dish. Throw the dill-stalks aside and take the herbs out of the small-cloth and sprinkle the whole pepper over the flesh. Lay the mace here and there whole on the flesh and on the rims of the dish, also the whole ginger in small-slices sliced on the flesh and on the rims of the dish laid and serve to the tables. It is ready and excellent.


164. How to boil wether-flesh in the English manner.

Take a wether-thigh, put it on the fire, salt it appropriately and skim it clean and take green noble flesh-herbs, much parsley, and some borage, some leek and pound together very small, beat two or three eggs with the pounded herbs, put therewith some ginger-powder and leave this a bit to boil in the same broth that the flesh was boiled in and then lay the flesh in a dish pour the broth thereover and serve additionally to the tables.


165. How to stew a wether-thigh.

Take the wether-thigh, fill it between skin and flesh -- you should begin near the thin flat-piece -- and so additionally onwards. The filling should be: young parsley, thyme, noble marjoram very small-crushed, crush therewith a hard-boiled egg, and a good slice of butter. Then put therewith sugar, ginger-powder, some cinnamon-powder, and currants or what you want and so fill in the thigh. Then put it on the fire with some salt and skim it clean, leave it to boil until it is tender. Then take some of the clearest broth and fat that the thigh is boiled in and some verjuice, cloves, pepper, ginger, cinnamon-powder, plums and currants and lemons if you wish. Leave this together to stew well until the plums and the lemons are almost enough, then put therewith the thigh. Leave to stew additionally until it is enough and then serve. If you wish to stew the thigh entirely white with the plums and herbs, then leave pepper and cloves thereout, boil the plums alone in some of its own broth, put over in the dish where the braised thigh is. You might also stew the thigh with hot herbs to wit: with mace or nutmeg, ginger, cinnamon, pepper, lemons, and some sugar and stuff it so until perfect. Then you might not fill it with green herbs to stew entirely white. When you stuff it brown, so might you add also much bastard [wine].


166. How to stew a calf's-udder.

Take noble flesh-herbs and much parsley, crush it very small with one or two hard-boiled eggs. Then put therewith much unmelted butter, ginger-powder, currants, sugar, and fill together between skin and flesh. Then boil the udder in clean water with some salt -- clean-skimmed -- very tender, thereafter cut it apart and set to stew in the same broth with some verjuice or wine, butter, and whole mace. Leave together to stew until it is enough. Then dress it on and serve.


Nota: When you stew with lemons if you wish it, always lay the slices first to soak a bit in clean water to pull most of the saltiness [?] out a bit.


167. How to make filling for chickens, doves or calf's-udder, between skin and flesh.

Take a good part of parsley and additionally noble flesh-herbs, crush it very small. Then take two eggs small-beaten and stir that with butter over the fire. Then put with the pounded herbs and also a small-crumbs of white-bread, then pound together very small. Take out and put therewith some ginger-powder, cinnamon-powder, and some sugar and then fill additionally what you want in it. This is for many chickens.


168. How to stew calf's-shank or a whole capon in the English manner. Good for invalids.

168a Take the shank, put it on the fire with clean water and a bit of salt. Skim it clean and when it has boiled a bit, so put therewith a crumb of white-bread, leave with to boil and as it is almost well cooked thus put therewith a cruse of Rhenish wine, or three or four spoons of verjuice, and a crushed nutmeg, and some broken mace with three or four whole petals of mace, some saffron, and leave this together to boil until it is enough. Dress it on for the invalids. It strengthens all the members, it cleans and opens the nature. However it should be an unreduced broth and one adds also ginger-powder who wishes.

168b In this manner you might also make a capon ready, however you should boil with the capon a kidney-piece of wether-flesh and as you add the spices, so should you put it just as for the calf's-shank. You might put therewith also currants. Healthy [people] might also well [eat this].


169. How to stew small-hens and small-doves with bacon.

Take green noble flesh-herbs with bacon small-chopped, put therewith ginger, cloves, and some pepper-powder, stick it inside in the belly, not between skin and flesh and lard it with bacon and set to stew with water with butter and with bacon sliced in long pieces and add spices. Leave to stew on a small fire until it is enough. However before you dress it on, so add some wine or some vinegar and leave so to boil a bit and then dress it on and serve to the tables.


170. How to stew pig's-feet.

Take boiled pig's-feet and take Rhenish wine, butter, and some vinegar, ginger, cinnamon-powder, sugar, and some saffron. Leave this together to boil and then lay therein the feet. Leave this together to stew until it is enough and serve to the tables. Thus might you stew also calf's- and sheep's-feet. You might take also wether-broth instead of wine.


171. How to stew calf's- and sheep's-feet.

171a Take boiled calf's-feet and break them into three or four pieces or leave whole and take wether-broth with some verjuice and butter and ginger-powder. Leave this to boil all together. Then lay therein the feet and leave to stew together until it is almost enough. Then take green chopped-up noble flesh-herbs, put them with the feet and shake it therewith and leave in a small-boiler to boil uncovered so that the herbs do not become weak and if you want it yellow, add saffron. Dress it on and serve to the tables.

171b Now additionally how to stew the sheep's-feet. Take wether-broth and verjuice, butter, ginger-powder, and currants. Leave this together to boil and then lay therein the boiled sheep's-feet. Leave to stew almost enough, then add some sugar and saffron, leave to stew additionally until it is enough. Then dress it and serve. Thus might you also stew pig's-feet and calf's-feet.


172. How to make broth on a broiled oxen-foot on the roaster.

Take butter, vinegar, and some sugar, pepper, clove-powder, and some saffron. Leave this together to boil until it is thickened. Then pour over the foot and sprinkle thereon ginger-powder and serve. Or if you want the broth not brown, so leave clove and pepper out and take instead ginger-powder.


173. How to stew an oxen-tongue.

Take a salted oxen-tongue, boil it a bit fully-tender or a bit more than half, then take the tongue out of the pot, leave to become cold. Then obtain thereout what has stood behind on the neck [=hollow out from the neck end] and fill the opening with bone-marrow, currants, sugar, cinnamon, and stick in the tongue cloves and take a new pot, put therein bastard [wine] or Rhenish wine and sugar, currants, cinnamon-powder, and some ginger-powder, and dates sliced in long pieces. Leave this together to boil and then lay therein the tongue and leave together to stew until it is enough. Then dress it on and then sprinkle there what you you wish and serve to the tables. If you want it fat, so add butter.


174. How to stew a calf's-liver.

Take green noble flesh-herbs, however mostly parsley. Chop up very small -- you might therewith also chop up a bit of onion -- and put therewith ginger or pepper-powder, some butter, some salt, and currants and take crushed filling, just as taken for the chickens, doves, or calf's-udder and take a knife, stick an opening or two in the liver and stick therein the filling. Then rub [>wrap] the liver in a calf's-caul and put in a clean pot with water and butter with some salt or wether-broth with butter. Leave so to boil until it is almost enough. Then add some verjuice or Rhenish wine and leave together to boil until it is enough and serve to the tables. If you wish, you might put there also in the pot currants and saffron and then leave also therewith to boil at the first.


175. How to broil a calf's-liver.

Take green noble flesh-herbs, mostly parsley and make thereof a filling just as one makes for calf's-udders and put therewith currants if you wish. Take a knife, stick openings in the liver and stick therein your filling. Then wrap in a calf's-caul or lamb's-caul or pig's-caul. Then stick your liver on the spit. Tie it with string on the spit so that it does not fall off and baste it well with butter and cinnamon-powder. Stick cloves in the liver. When it is now enough, so serve to the tables. If you wish to make thereon a broth, so take the fat from the pans and some bastard [wine] or Rhenish wine with sugar, with cinnamon-powder, a bit of clove-powder, and some vinegar, if you wish. Leave this together to boil until it is thickened. Then pour over the roasted [meat].


176. How to make small small-foods to set with the first [course] on the table or with the roasted [meat].

Take white-bread, cut in round slices and stick in each slice cloves as many as you think good. Lay so on the roaster, roast it and then lay in the pan with the roasted [meat]. Leave to soak just as one leaves the bread to soak with the snipes. When you set it now on the tables, so sprinkle thereon cinnamon and ginger-powder. Set it in small small-dishes. If you wish, you might make thereon a sauce of wine, sugar, cinnamon, ginger-powder or pepper, and clove-powder.


177. How to make small-broths of bone-marrow.

Take Rhenish wine and bone-marrow removed from the pipes, boil together. When it has now boiled a small-period, so add sugar, currants, cinnamon-powder, some ginger, and some clove-powder and leave this together to boil until it is enough. Then take small small-slices of roasted white-bread and lay in small small-dishes, pour this broth thereover and sprinkle thereon cinnamon or ginger-powder and serve to the tables with the roasted [meat].


178. How to make "Deusegeerkens" [sweet bread-like cookies] of veal.

Take cold calf's- or wether-flesh broiled or boiled and chop it as small as stuffing. Beat in a small-pot or basin five or six eggs until it is very much as you want and if you wish, thus add a bit of saffron with a bit of rose-water, mace, cinnamon-powder, clove-powder, sugar, and currants. Stir this well with the eggs with the chopped flesh so that it is as thick tempered just as for "Deusegeerkens" and then take clean clear roast-fat -- [if you] have it -- or fresh butter in a pan. Make that very hot and bake therein three or four small-cakes the same as one bakes the "Deusegeerkens". Lay there three or four in a dish, sprinkle thereon much sugar and cinnamon-powder and serve to the tables.


179. How to make a sausage of chopped flesh or liver.

Take boiled veal or wether-flesh and also some boiled calf's-liver. Chop it very small together with some cooked or uncooked calf's- or wether-fat and chop or chop-up noble flesh-herbs very small and put it with the chopped flesh. Put therewith currants, sugar, pepper or ginger-powder, and clove-powder, mix well together and take a calf's-caul, spread this chopped paste thereon very thick and then roll thus together so that it is just like a thick sausage and as the paste is all rolled in, thus let the caul now once or twice wrap-around without paste so that it should be more-secure and skewer the sausage closed on both sides just as for a sausage. Then tie it on the spit with string or on other roasted [meat] and leave it to broil until it is enough. Then serve to the tables with other roasted [meat].


180. How to make small-rolls of veal.

Take raw veal where it is thinnest on the buttock and it is fleshiest. Let your round or long slices be cut, some two hands broad, round or lengthwise and a good finger thick. Chop that on the side carefully so that it does not go through [=each slice is scored on one face]. Then take calf's-suet or other fat and noble green flesh-herbs, chop it together very small. Then put therewith some salt, ginger or pepper-powder, and some currants. Then take of this chopped filling, roll in each piece separately on the chopped side inwards, roll thereafter each piece separately in a calf's-small-caul and tie with string on a wooden skewer two and two together. Leave well one and a half hours to broil in front of the fire and baste it with butter. Then lay in a dish and serve. You might also tie it on your other roasted [meat] or you might also braise it in a pot.


181. How to make the ox pot-pasty in the slaughter-time.

Take three pounds of flesh of the buttock of the ox and three quarter-parts of suet. Chop it very small each separately, put the chopped fat in a small-basin and the chopped flesh in a pot with water, salt it appropriately, skim it clean and leave to boil until it does not foam/scum any more. Then put therewith the chopped fat, leave so together to boil and if there then comes thereon foam/scum, so skim it off, however as the pot begins to boil so set it off the fire and when you think that it is boiled enough, then pour as much broth off until you think that you have enough to stew. Then pour within the pot a firkin of bastard [wine] and sample whether it is sweet enough; if it is not sweet enough, so put therewith more. Then put therewith currants, ginger-powder, clove-powder, and much mace or nutmeg-powder and additionally as many Damson plums as you think good. Leave this to stew together very reduced, however stir continually so that it does not burn and when it is enough, so cover closed and set it aside, however not in the cellar or it should quickly separate out. Some [persons] leave the plums out because from the plums it thus quickly separates apart and when you want to heat the pot-pasty through a bit, so take some plums and put in a small-pan with wether-broth. Boil it therein soft, then pour the broth off and put thereon some cold pot-pasty of plums and warm it so together and dress it on and serve. One keeps this pot-pasty as long as it remains good.


182. How to make flesh-balls, small-sausages, or small-ravioli.

182a Take lard-bacon, boil tender, chop it very small and put therewith grated white-bread, eggs until you think good, green noble herbs, currants, sugar, pepper or ginger-powder, a small-little of wine. Mix all together, put this paste in fine dough and make appropriately just as for small-ravioli. Spur off and bake in white clarified wether-fat.

182b Item roll this paste in fine dough just like balls or roll in fine dough just like small-sausages. Then take three or four egg yolks, beat it small, roll these three sorts of dough therein and bake or fry it in clean melted fat. Then serve to the table and sprinkle thereon sugar and cinnamon. If you have no lard-bacon, take chopped flesh boiled or broiled, with chopped bacon.


183. How to make blood-sausages, liver-sausages, white sausages, and hulled-barley-sausages.

183a Take the blood as it comes hot out of the pig and stir well and rub to pieces with the hands until the blood is cold or otherwise the blood would coagulate. When you go to make your paste, so dilute your blood with warm broth that the small-feet are boiled in and add grated white-bread -- that if you wish take hulled barley instead of white-bread, however bread is best -- put therewith pepper-powder, clove-powder, sage, and salt, however put the powders therein before you put the bread in. Mix well together and you should leave to stand a good three or four hours long, at least while you stream the sausages out [=let the casings empty] and as you go to fill, then put therewith first the fat and you might put the skins however a bit more than half full and then skewer it closed. Leave water in the steam bowls before you put it in and then leave a half hour to boil. You should therein continually inspect the boiler so that you thereout with a skewer stick the wind [=pop air bubbles in the sausages]. When you pull it out of the boiler so stick it in a bucket of water because it should be pure. Thereafter lay on straw and leave to become cold.

183b Thus might you put with liver-, hulled-barley-, and white-bread-sausages, however pound the liver raw and rub through a metal colander and if everything does not continue [=go through the colander] as you wish, so take now and then a spoon of warm foot-broth and rub thus through [the colander] and as you make your paste, so dilute your liver also with warm foot-broth and then put therewith pepper, nutmeg-powder, and salt and mix well. Then put therewith also grated white-bread and mix well. Then leave to stand and add your fat as above.

183c Additionally how to make white-bread-sausages. Break your bread and set it in sweet-milk to soak. When you go to make your paste, then break your bread very small and put therewith pepper-powder, saffron, and salt. Mix well together and as you go to fill, add your fat as above.

183d How to make hulled-barley-sausages. Take warm wether-broth, put therein your hulled barley and put therewith ginger, mace-powder, and salt. Mix well as you go to fill. Add your fat as above, however your fat that you put in all the sausages, the pests should well removed. Of the intestine-sausage-casings the pests should also become pulled-off or otherwise the sausages would leak. If you wish, put therein also much onion.


184. How to make sausages.

Take pork, chop it very small and then add pepper-powder, sage, whole-nutmeg or nutmeg-powder. Mix these powders well with this chopped flesh, then salt it well and mix well together with the salt also and if you want, so might you stick some whole cloves therein. Then fill the flesh in your intestine-sausage-casings and make as long as you want, however your intestine-sausage-casings should lie in lukewarm water as you fill them.


185. How to boil sturgeon.

Take water and vinegar, much salt, and fennel greens. Boil herewith and serve to the table when it is enough and lay thereon fennel greens. Set vinegar in small-saucers on the table.


186. How to boil lobsters and crabs.

Take water, vinegar, salt, and much pepper-powder, leave together in the steam bowls, then add the living lobsters and leave to boil until it is enough. Thereafter serve. Some [persons] take red wine in plates of water, vinegar, and salt, however for thus the water should not first boil well.


187. How to broil sturgeon.

Take the sturgeon and stick on the spit and as it has broiled well, so stick therein much cloves and baste it with butter, sugar, cinnamon or with butter, cinnamon, and bastard [wine]. The small-broths thereon should be: butter, wine, sugar, cinnamon, ginger. This boiled together and poured on the broiled sturgeon and so served on. This same you might put also on boiled sturgeon.


188. How to make hotchpotch of sturgeon.

188a Take the tail of the sturgeon, cut it in round pieces, then take the skin of the sturgeon and scrub [?] open, scrape and wash it clean. Then cut it in long pieces a finger long and two finger broad. Put the skin on the fire with water, salt and butter and skim it and leave it almost two hours to boil, then put therewith the sturgeon in the same pot and leave it together now to boil about a hour. Then cut it apart just like other hotchpotch and blow all the fatty broth off and set it therewith to stew. Put therewith pepper, cloves, mace, ginger all powdered, butter, and currants. Leave thus together to stew until it is enough and serve it to the tables.

188b If you wish, you might make on this hotchpotch also black pepper. Take black broiled rye-bread and soak in Rhenish wine. Then put it together through a sieve [and] put therewith sugar, cinnamon, ginger, mace, cloves, pepper all powdered. Leave this together to boil. Then lay therein the hotchpotch and leave to stew until it is enough. Thereafter dress it on and serve, stir it continually so that it does not burn. If you wish, you might also put herewith a handful of chopped-up green flesh-herbs at the last. You might also take bastard [wine] instead of Rhenish wine; if you have no sugar.


189. How to stew a piece of salmon with orange-peels.

Take dried orange-peels and boil it in clean water [to drive] a bit of the bitterness off, cut it in small pieces and put in a clean earthen pot. Put therewith wine, butter, ginger, cinnamon and leave this together in steam bowls. Lay therein a clean-washed thick piece of salmon and leave thus to stand cleanly together to stew until it is enough. Then serve to the tables, however turn the salmon now and then in the pot. You might put therewith also in the pot juice of oranges, leave to stew. When you serve it on, sprinkle thereon cinnamon.


190. How to make salmon-hotchpotch of the head.

Take the head of the salmon and hew it in two for hotchpotch and wash it clean. Then take a clean pot, put there wine, vinegar, butter, and a bit of onion small-sliced, however properly to have a fragrance. Leave this together to boil until the onion is fully-soft. Then put therewith now some cloves, pepper, mace powdered, and some sugar. Leave this together now in a small-boiler to boil. Then put therewith the salmon and leave together to stew until it is almost enough. Then put therewith a bit of saffron and leave to stew additionally until it is enough. Dress it on and serve.


191. How to make a salmon-pasty in a dish.

Take salmon, cut it in thin small-slices. Then take now salmon and chop that very small with onion and noble green herbs. Then put therewith sugar, cinnamon, ginger, salt, butter, currants, and some wine. Mix well together and "weyndet" [?] and turn the small-slices salmons well therein. Then take a dish with butter, wine, and some verjuice and sugar. Leave this together to boil. Then lay therein salmon and cover it closed with another dish and set it so in a coffer with fire. Leave thus to stand to stew until it is enough. Then serve.


192. How to make round salmon-small-pasties.

Take salmon and peeled "Laukens"-pears [?] and chop it together very small and then put therewith blue [=when the salmon is lightly cooked] raisins, currants, sugar, ginger, some salt, some saffron, and eggs. Mix together well. Make very fine dough and make thereof round small-pasties. Put this paste therewith and spur your covers beautiful and bake in the oven or in your tart-pan, however lay there-under paper as you bake. Then serve. When it is enough, if you wish, so might you put in the paste also a bit of butter.


193. How to boil a pike and carp blue.

193a Take the pike. Kill it and cut the head off round, leaving fish thereon as much as you want [=head plus as much of the fish as you want]. Cleave the pike also in front of the tail, that you have two pieces one with the tail and the rest. Make as many pieces as you want [of the middle of the fish]. Then wash it clean. Put it in a basin and put thereon vinegar and then put your water on the fire, well salted, as it boils, thus put your pike therein and keep it so to boil until the steam will come out of the boiler, until it is enough. Then set the head whole upright in the middle of dish and lay the other pieces everywhere and stick the roe or "darmen" [intestines?] of the pike in the mouth and bring it thus dry and hot to the tables and set ginger-powder in small-saucers therewith. If you wish, you might pour butter, vinegar and ginger boiled together thereover and so serve.

193b Thus might you also cook a carp, however you should cleave the head of the carp also just as the body. Then you might also leave one or two whole onions with it to boil in the boiler. Also whole herbs tied in a small-cloth, to wit: ginger, mace, pepper. And as you serve it all hot, so lay the ginger sliced in flat pieces here and there on the dish and fish, also the whole mace and sprinkle the whole pepper over the fish or carp. Serve it thus hot to the tables. Or you might make it ready just as the pike. Some [persons] boil the pike in half Rhenish wine and half water because it should boil whole blue. However the pike or carp should be cooked in whole living; it would otherwise not be blue.


194. How to make a jelly on a pike.

Take a clean pike of colour. Kill it living, because it should be very blue. Put therewith additionally as above and set it dry in a dish. Then take 2 ounces of isinglass clean-washed and sliced in small pieces and boil the isinglass in a pint of Rhenish wine until it is melted. Thereafter pour so through a sieve. Then put in a small-pot, put therewith much ginger-powder and some mace-powder and leave together about a half quarter-part of an hour to boil and then add some vinegar and sugar and also some good saffron. Then leave together now in a small-boiler to boil and if you wish to have your jelly clean and clear, so leave to stream once thus hot through a Hippocras-sack into a dish and set the head of the pike therein upright and the other pieces everywhere and lay here and there in the jelly peeled almonds and leave so to stand to stiffen. Then it is ready to serve when it is stiff, however make [sure] that your jelly tastes sour.


195. How to stew a carp.

195a Take the carp, cut it in round small-slices and wash it clean, then take half wine and half water, butter, salt, ginger, and pepper-powder and stuff it therein until it is enough. Then serve it to the tables, however first remove the scales, or if you wish, leave them on.

195b In another manner. Take the carp and remove the scales. Then cleave it. Cut each piece in five pieces and wash it clean. Then take half wine, half water and some butter, if you want it and leave the carp herein to stew half enough. Then take rye-bread and roast it very brown and lay to soak in half wine and half water. Then put it through a sieve and then put it with the carp and put also therewith some salt, ginger-powder, and sugar. Leave so together to stew until it is enough. Then serve. However in the stew, boil well closed so that your broth is not too thick or too thin.

195c Now another manner to stew a carp on the skeleton. Take the carp and remove the scales. Then also remove the skin. Then pull also the fish off the fish-bones, however let the skeleton and the head remain therein all whole and chop the fish with an onion very small, also with parsley. Put together in a pot with half wine and half water, butter, some salt, ginger, pepper-powder, currants, sugar, and leave this together to stew until it is enough, however watch that it is not too thin of a broth. And leave the whole skeleton on which the head is also all whole to boil in a boiler with some water until it is enough, however [ensure] that it does not boil into pieces. Then lay the whole skeleton in a dish and lay thereon the braised fish or paste everywhere on the skeleton and serve to the tables.


196. How to broil eel.

Take the eel and make it clean and cut it in as large pieces as you want and then stick it on the spit and stick between the pieces green herbs, to wit: parsley, bay laurel leaves, thyme, and rosemary. Then baste well with wine, butter and vinegar. And when it is broiled enough, so then put in the broth ginger and pepper. Boil together. Then pour on the broiled eel and serve to the tables.


197. How to stew eel.

197a Take the eel when it is clean-washed. Cut it as large as you please. Then take some water, some vinegar, butter, ginger or pepper, and onion sliced in small-slices. Leave this together to boil. Then put therewith the eel and some salt. Leave this together to stew until it is enough. Then chop-up small green noble-herbs, mostly parsley and put in the pot with the eel and leave in a small-boiler with to boil. Dress it on and serve to the tables.

197b In another manner with yellow broth. Take clean water, some verjuice, some salt, butter, and ginger. Leave this together to boil, add the eel and leave it to stew until it is almost enough. Then take a crumb of white-bread soaked in vinegar. Put through a sieve and then put it with the eel also some saffron and leave together to stew until it is enough. Then dress it on and serve.


198. How to make a green sauce for plaice or fish.

Take green sorrel, small-crushed. Then lay a crumb of rye-bread to soak in some vinegar. Then put with the sorrel in the mortar with vinegar and crush it now a bit together. Then put with the broth through a sieve and first pour melted butter over the boiled flounder or plaice. Then pour this green pushed through broth also thereover. So it remains best green and serve to the tables.


199. How to make sauce for broiled salmon and shad.

Take the salmon or shad as it broils and baste it well with butter. Take peeled oranges, cut them in round small-slices and put in a small-pot, or add nothing more than the juice out of the oranges. Put therewith wine, sugar, ginger-powder, some saffron, and some butter, if you please. Thereafter leave together to boil and then pour over the broiled salmon or shad and serve.


200. How to make sauce on a broiled fish.

Take plums and remove the stones and pound very small in a mortar with some rye-bread. Then put through a sieve with Rhenish wine. Then put therewith sugar and ginger-powder. Leave so together to boil. Then pour over the broiled fish and serve it to the tables, or you might take bastard [wine] instead of Rhenish wine and sugar.


201. How to make pot-pasty of souse-herring.

Take souse-herring and remove all the fish-bones. Then chop the fish small and boil the chopped herring in clean water [to remove] the saltiness. Then take the herring out of the water and take wine and some vinegar and butter and leave to boil. Then add the herring and put therewith currants, plums, sugar, cloves, and pepper-powder and leave together to stew until it is enough. Then dress it in small-dishes and serve to the tables.


202. How to make blanc-manger for broiled fish.

Take peeled almonds, a crumb of white-bread, and put some ginger-powder therewith. Pound together very small and rub together through a sieve with warm water. Then add much sugar and leave together to boil until it is thick enough. Then put in a dish, leave a bit to cool and lay therein the fish and sprinkle thereover ginger or cinnamon-powder and serve.


203. How to bake a "Tasey" [kind of omelette] of smelt.

Take clean washed smelt, leave however five or six in a small-boiler to boil with a bit of salt. Skim it clean, take it out and loosen also all of the fish-bones. Pull them out so that the smelt thus remains as whole as possible. Leave the fish to drain well, then melt the butter in your pan and lay your smelt therein and leave it therein a bit to roast. Then pour thereover five or six eggs small-beaten and leave your "Tasey" to bake thus for a longer time, [ensure] that it does not burn. Then you might not reverse it when it is baked enough. Thus lay your dish on top of the pan and turn your "Tasey" so that the fish comes underneath. Then sprinkle over your "Tasey" sugar and ginger and serve.


204. How to bake a English herbs-cake.

Take tansy and spinach. Pound very small. Then put the broth through a sieve and break therein as many eggs as you think good, sugar, mace or nutmeg-powder and then bake it in brown butter and sprinkle thereon cinnamon and sugar.


205. How to stew spinach.

Take spinach and boil it soft. Then remove the clean water. Then take peeled apples. Chop very small with the spinach. Set together to stew with wine and a bit of verjuice, sugar, ginger, and butter. Leave this together to stew until is enough. Then dress it in small-dishes and sprinkle thereover ginger. Then serve this paste. You might also bake round small-pies or round small-cakes fried in the butter.


206. How to bake a carpenter's-"Tasey" [kind of omelette].

Take peeled apples or pears. Cut it in small round small-slices and leave in the butter to boil soft. Then beat your eggs small. Then put your soft apples with butter in the beaten eggs. Put therewith sugar and cinnamon-powder. Then put again a bit of butter in the pan and leave to become warm. Thereafter pour your eggs with all that is therein in the pan with the butter and bake thereof a "Tasey". Then sprinkle thereover sugar and serve to the tables. One does not turn it in the pan.


207. How to bake a "Tasey" [kind of omelette] of gooseberries.

Take fresh butter and melt in a pan. Then add as many gooseberries that they lie almost two fingers high and leave with the butter a bit to boil until they have however lost the proper colour. Then beat very small 7, 8 or 9 eggs with some ginger and some rose-water. Pour together over the berries and leave so over a coal-fire to bake [and ensure] that they not burn. When the "Tasey" is baked enough, so leave to rise properly out of the pan in the dish so that it does not break. Then sprinkle thereon sugar and cinnamon and serve.


208. How to make "Cassaerts" [type of omelette] of eggs.

Take three or four eggs very small-beaten. Then put therewith sugar and cinnamon-powder. Then bake the "Cassaerts" or small-cakes as thin as omelettes in melted butter. Then sprinkle thereon cinnamon and serve.


209. How to make or boil rice in the Antwerp manner.

Take your milk and add some butter or without butter and leave in steam bowls that the milk rises. Then take the rice clean washed in warm water and leave a while to stand in warm water and put it in boiling milk and leave so to boil together, however stir now and then so that it does not burn. Then add, when it is half cooked, saffron, and sugar and leave forward [near the fire] to boil until it is enough. Then dress it in small-dishes and sprinkle thereon cinnamon and sugar and serve. For a pound of rice take four jars of milk and a half pound of sugar.


210. How to make a custard of rice flour.

Take a jar of sweet cream, two ounces of rice flour, thirteen egg yolks and a little rose-water. Temper this well together, add as much sugar as you think good. Leave this together to boil until it is enough, however stir it well so that it does not burn. Then dress on and sprinkle thereon cinnamon-powder, so that it is as you want it.


211. How to make Spanish custard.

Take three eggs, the poultry [?] removed and beat it small with three small-eat-spoons of wheat-flour and three pints of sweet milk and about a half small-rummer of rose-water and much sugar. Temper it well together and boil it as it befits. Then dress in your small-dishes. When it is cold, sprinkle thereon pomegranate-pips and serve or sprinkle thereon cinnamon-powder as it pleases you. Or otherwise take for a pint of sweet-milk [approximately 1 gram] of flour, some rose-water, much sugar, two or three egg yolks together tempered and boiled, and dressed as above.


212. How to make wine-custard.

Take three egg yolks, a pint of Rhenish wine, a half "blanck" [halfpennyworth] of wheat-flour, much sugar, and cinnamon and tempered just as for Spanish custard, also boiled, dressed, sprinkled, served.


213. How to make a wine-broth.

Take a firkin of Rhenish wine, some butter, some ginger-powder, much sugar. Leave this together to boil a bit in a clean small-pot. Then roast four or five small-slices of white-bread, lay in a dish, then pour [the broth] thereover this and set it thus hot on the table and [make sure] that it is as you wish, so lay on each piece of bread also a half broiled apple, the core and peels removed and sprinkle thereon cinnamon.


214. How to shell [poach] eggs in wine.

Take a firkin of Rhenish wine in an iron pan and leave to boil and shell therein eggs, as many as you please, just one does the eggs in the water. Then take as many small-slices of roasted or unroasted white-bread, as you have eggs and take the eggs with a foam-spoon out of the wine when they are boiled and lay an egg on each small-slice of bread. Then put with the wine a slice of butter, sugar, cinnamon and leave this together to boil. Pour over the eggs in the dish, sprinkle thereover cinnamon and serve.


215. How to make omelette Lombardy.

Take two egg yolks, beat it small with 6 or 7 small-eat-spoons of Rhenish wine and about half a small-spoon of rose-water, sugar as much as you wish. Leave thus to stand on coals to boil until you [think] it is thick enough, however stir well so that it does not burn and if you wish to make an omelette Lombardy for the eggs, so you should leave it to become thicker and as you serve it, sprinkle thereover cinnamon.


216. How to make small-foods of sweet-cherries, sour-cherries or plums.

Take plums, sweet-cherries or sour-cherries, remove the stones and put in a clean pot. Rub with a clean hand or spoon well into pieces. Then rub through a sifter or sieve. Then lay crumbs of white-bread to soak in some sweet-milk. Take four or five egg yolks small-beaten and rub with the bread and milk through a sieve. Take thereafter all together with the other strained paste and put in a pot. Leave together to boil until it thickens. Then dress it on in dishes, sprinkle thereover sugar and cinnamon and serve.


217. How to stew medlars.

Take the medlars. Cut the crown off, then put in a small-pot and put therewith wine, butter, sugar, cinnamon, and colour it with turnsole or carrots and leave together to braise until it is enough. Then set in dishes and sprinkle thereover cinnamon and serve.


218. How to stew "Laukens"-pears [?] or quince-pears very excellent.

218a Take quinces, peel and cut it in ten or twelve pieces. Put in a clean small-pot and put therewith wine, much sugar, a piece of cinnamon or two, carrots clean scraped, the bone-marrow sliced-out. Put together over the fire, however the pears should always be covered over by the wine. Leave this together to boil very strongly, just as veal is uncovered, however it does not properly boil or the broth would be spoiled and should not stand in the dish just like jelly. When it is enough, dress it on and serve. And the "Laukens"-pears [?] you should stew also thus, however you should leave it whole and set with the small-stalks properly upright in the dish and serve. You should first pour the broth in the dish and the pears thereon. You might also leave your quinces whole or half.

218b In another manner. Take your peeled quinces whole. Remove the cores, fill the opening with currants and a piece of oxen-bone-marrow thereon and stick three or four cloves in the pears or leave the cloves out, as you please. Then take Rhenish wine or red wine, much sugar, whole cinnamon, [for colour] scraped carrots with the core removed or turnsole. Then leave together to boil. Set the quinces or "Laukens"-pears [?] all whole in the steam [bowls] and leave together to stew until it is enough. Then set the pears whole in the dish. Pour the broth thereover and sprinkle thereon cinnamon-powder and serve. You might also take much butter instead of bone-marrow.


219. How to make blanc-manger.

Take rice flour, sweet cream, and some rose-water. Then put together through a clean cloth or serviette. Take grated sugar, put therewith, put in a clean boiler and boil together until it is very thick. Then take wether-suet, melt and leave to stream through a colander or sieve into cold water. Then take the fat out of the water and put in the blanc-manger, stir and leave together to boil until it is enough, however stir well so that it does not burn. Then put the one half in a dish and leave to cool and serve and put with the other half some saffron, tempered with rose-water. This paste you might cut and make thereof what you please. You might thereof also make pasties in very fine dough and roll as thin as paper in thin covers. Rub it on the inwards side with sweet melted butter or melted suet and the other side sprinkle that with flour. Make your pasty with five angles, fill however half full and lay thereon also a thin cover and stick it with a knife full of openings. Set in the oven on paper, however make sure that the oven is not too hot. You might bake thereof also ravioli.


220. How to bake a custard in a dish.

Take six or seven eggs small-beaten, however the poultry [?] should first be completely removed. You might temper therewith also a small-spoon of flour, a pint of sweet-milk, and much sugar. Temper it together well and then put in a clean dish. Cover closed with another dish and set so on a trivet on the fire. Then leave so to stand to boil until it is stiff, just as for another custard and while the same bakes, so lay an iron top-crust in the fire so that it is very glowing and when the custard is enough, so keep this iron whole tight with the custard until it blisters, however do not cover-completely with it or it [=the custard] would [get] water. Then sprinkle thereon cinnamon and sugar and serve.


221. How to make a flat cheese of butter-milk.

Take as much butter-milk as you think good, however it should be fresh, thick and good, if it is a bit scarce, do not lay thereon and hang the previous day's [cheese] as you make it the other day if you wish in clean serviette or tablecloth to drain all the whey out. Tie it securely closed around the milk and hang the serviette on a nail to drain and when it is very dry, then take to the thick [matter] from a stoup of milk twelve egg yolks very small-beaten, much sugar, and some rose-water and temper it together. Then put with the dry milk that you take out of the serviette, temper it well together. Then lay with a spoon in a dish in a hoop, just as for a flat cheese and pour thereover cream and serve. You might leave the eggs out, if you wish, you might also lay very fine small-cloths wrung out in clean water on cheese-small-basins or cheese-small-hurdles and lay thereon the tempered butter-milk. Leave therein a while to drain, lay out the small-cloths in the dishes and pour the cream over and serve.


222. How to make a flat cheese of sweet-milk.

222a Take a jar of sweet-milk, set it on the fire or hang it over the fire and leave to become blood-lukewarm. Then add as much rennet as should go in a half thimble. Then set it off of the fire and stir well together and stop very tight closed. Leave so to stand to coagulate off the fire and when it is well coagulated, so pour in a cheeses-small-sieve and leave so to drain until the whey is well out. Then pour in a dish, put thereover cream and also sugar if you wish and serve.

222b In another manner. Take a jar of sweet-milk, add a bit of rennet. Stir all cold and set it thus in a pot closed-covered for the-following-day. Then lay on a cheese-small-sieve a fine small-cloth wrung out in clean water, pour the cheese therein, leave it thus to stand to drain entirely dry and temper two egg yolks entirely thinly with cream and sugar. Beat it with the dry, drained cheese entirely evenly and dress it so together in small-dishes and serve.


223. How to bake omelettes.

Take six eggs small-beaten with a bit of yeast. Then put therewith almost a pint of sweet-milk, made hot. Temper therewith now almost a small-pan of melted butter, clear off, the bottom-broth and foam/scum removed. Then temper therewith the flour, it should be so thick that the paste streams into the pan. Then set at the fire and leave to stand to rise in a covered dish and when it is risen or lifted, you might go to bake. When you now go to bake, then if your paste is too thick, thus thin with the milk, that you have kept.


224. How to bake a dry cake in a tart-pan.

Take for a small copper roast-pan four eggs small-beaten with a bit of yeast and a good three tin spoons full of hot melted butter. Mix well together, then temper therewith as much wheat-flour so that it is as thick as paste for baking well-waffles. Then put in the pan a bit of melted butter, lay this paste spread out therein, as wide as the pan is and set an iron cover thereon. Then set the pan on a trivet or roaster, lay fire thereunder and on top of, leave a long time to stand to bake. Lift the top-crust continually off, [to check] that it does not become scorched and when it is baked enough, so cleave it in two or in three and put there melted butter between. Then it is ready to eat and then serve.


225. How to make pies of apples in the Walloon manner.

Take apples peeled and cut them in quarters. Boil it very soft in Rhenish wine, butter, sugar, ginger, currants. When it is boiled together very soft, then stir therein two egg yolks. Lay your paste in fine dough and bake as above and it is ready.


226. How to bake an excellent pie of very short dough.

Take fine wheat-flour in a dish and add a raw egg, unbeaten or if the pie is large, thus take now a raw yolk therewith and spread it out well in there or with the flour in pieces. Then take a firkin of water, share that in three, take one part of it and put in a small-bowl. Put therein a lump of butter, as large as or a bit more than a half egg. Set this in a coffer with fire and leave together thus to become warm, however so that the butter there does melt properly. Then make additionally your dough therewith. Work the dough well together, then take the one half of your dough and keep it equally warm in the small-bowl and roll the other half out very thinly and then fold in quarters. Sprinkle some flour in your tart-pan, or sprinkle butter in the pan that does not get used to travel [?], instead of the flour and lay this dough in the pan and fold thus in the pan so that your dough does not break and leave the dough to hang over the rims of the pan until you lay the top-crust thereon. Then spur off together, roll immediately the other dough out very thin and spur chevron-wise or such appropriately as you want. Then fold in quarters and leave to lie airing until you have filled your pie. Then cut your apples or pears in small small-slices and put in a dish and sprinkle thereon much sugar with some cinnamon. Stir well with the hand. Then lay this paste on the bottom in the pan and fill as thick as you wish. Then stick therein here and there a small-lump of butter so that there is a good half quarter-part [of a pound] of butter in together. Then lay theron your spurred top-crust and fold individually so that it does not break. Then spur off dough on the rims toward the pan, however join the dough together first with the finger and take a small-brush, rub the top of your pie with melted butter. Cover your pan and set on a bit of fire, however lay on top of the top-crust now as much fire as under and watch it continually so that it does not burn, and when it is almost baked, so shake now and then so that it does not burn underneath. When it is baked, so sprinkle thereover sugar and some cinnamon and serve. From this dough you might bake all pies, pasties, and tarts. And what an excellent [pie].


227. Cheese-tart.

So take and make your dough just as is cooked for the suggested apple-pie. Make your paste thus: take almost a half good fresh Tiense cheese and peel it everywhere. Then break it very small in a firkin of good sweet cream and put therewith also five raw egg yolks small-broken together. Then put therewith also two hot small-spoons of the best olive oil and almost a half pound of melted butter and a good handful of currants and much pepper-powder and mix by hand all together with cheese together well. It does however have a good fragrance of the pepper. Then take spinach and chop it up smaller or as small as you would make potage thereof and remove the broth between your hands [=squeeze to remove the liquid]. Put thereof as much in the suggested mixed cheese-paste until you think that it is thick enough and mix well together. Then lay your paste in your dough and in the pan. Cover as above and rub it with a small-brush with olive oil on the top-crust and leave a long time to bake [and ensure] that it does not burn or that it does not boil [so much that it] bubbles or it would become all "matten" [exhausted ?]. Watch it continually, and when it is baked, serve to the tables.


228. How to make an apple-pie.

Make dough as was suggested. Chop your apples small or almost small. Then put in a dish and sprinkle theron much sugar and cinnamon-powder with some ginger and some rose-water. Mix well together with the apples. Lay this paste in your dough and in your pan. Stick here and there within your paste pieces of fresh butter, lay your spurred top-crust thereon as above and bake as a spinach-pie. When it is now baked enough, sprinkle thereover sugar and cinnamon. You might also put fennel-seed and currants in this pie and the apples cut in quarters and then serve additionally.


229. How to make a chicken-pasty in the Walloon manner.

Take a half quarter of flour, put therein two eggs, small-beaten. Take additionally butter, water, a bit of saffron. Make warm and make therewith additionally dough for the crusts. Make your dough fine just as suggested for the fine pie. Then take four chickens, make clean. Beat all the bones into pieces, wash clean. Then take a clean cloth and dry it off well. Take cloves, pepper, mace, two nutmegs, some saffron, sugar, salt. Mix these powders all together and rub the chickens therewith and the rest sprinkle in the pasty with the chickens. Put therewith now a pound of plums, a pound of raisins, four ounces of currants, a good part of butter. Put all together with the chickens in the pasty. Put thereon the top-crust and leave to bake until it is almost enough. Then take two egg yolks small-beaten and put therewith Rhenish wine, verjuice, sugar, cinnamon and make thereof a caudle and put in the pasty. Stir your pasty with the caudle [=stir the mixture inside the pasty]. Then cover closed again and leave to bake until it is enough and serve warm to the tables.


230. How that one shall make a quarter [?] of a small-lamb-pasty.

Take plums, lemons, ginger, salt, and some suet chopped with some bacon, some sugar, and some butter, refreshed or diluted with verjuice.


231. How that one shall make a quail-small-pasty.

Take ginger, salt, sugar, bone-marrow, refreshed with verjuice.


232. How to make a young-rabbit-pasty.

Take ginger, salt, bacon, sugar, and bone-marrow, refreshed with cream or with egg yolks with rose-water.


233. How to make a pasty in the French [manner].

Take ginger, salt, some bacon, plums, and some gooseberries, sugar, butter, refreshed with verjuice.


234. How to make a salmon-pasty.

Take ginger, pepper, cloves, mace, and some sugar, currants, and butter.


235. How to make a capon-pasty.

Take ginger, salt, and some chopped bacon, bone-marrow, sugar, and butter and as it is half baked, then pour therein some water and thereafter egg yolks small-beaten with rose-water.


236. How to make quince-pear-pies.

Take quince-pears. Boil them soft. Then put through [a sieve] and put therewith cinnamon, sugar, and some ginger, some whole bone-marrow and pine nut kernels with some melted butter and an omelette small-beaten. Then fill and it should be dressed on and covered.


237. How to make a carp-pasty with the fish-bones.

Take pepper, grains of paradise, ginger, cloves, mace, lemons, currants and nutmeg, salt, butter.


238. How to make an almond-pie.

Take peeled almonds small-crushed and add egg yolks, some milk, some rose-water, sugar, and butter.


239. How to make a cold barbel-pasty.

Take pepper, cloves, ginger, salt, and some butter.


240. How to make a Spanish pasty.

Take wether-flesh, leave to boil tender and then small-chopped, bone-marrow with cinnamon, ginger, verjuice, salt, and some butter.


241. How to make a saltwater lamprey-pasty.

Take pepper, cloves, ginger, currants, sugar, and butter, refreshed with verjuice or wine.


242. How to make a fine pie.

Take nine eggs with the white or fourteen eggs and a pint of sweet-milk. Leave together to boil and when it is cooked, add much sugar and rose-water.


243. How to make a halibut pasty.

Take ginger, cloves, mace, pepper, salt, butter.


244. How to make small small-pasties in the fish-time [=on fish days].

Take eel and salmon or carp. Leave to boil. Then chop small and remove all the fish-bones, [add] currants, ginger, cloves, mace, butter, salt, verjuice, and leek as befits.


245. How to make a warm sturgeon-pasty.

Take ginger, currants, pepper, cloves, mace, salt, butter, and make a sauce just as for warm venison.


246. How to make a goose-pasty.

Take pepper, salt, cloves, mace, ginger, onion, butter, refreshed with verjuice or a little differently in white dough.


247. How to make a "Rogier" [name of pasty] pasty.

Take capons or rabbits with some veal and some pork if you can not otherwise obtain [veal], chopped together with suet and bone-marrow. Take ginger, cinnamon, sugar, salt, and whole bone-marrow however no currants on top thereof.


248. How to make a tongue-pasty.

Take bacon, suet, and some rosemary chopped together, salt, ginger, some cloves, butter, verjuice, and some bone-marrow if it pleases you.


249. How to make a conger-eel-pasty.

Take pepper, ginger, cloves, mace, sugar, salt, and butter.


250. How to make a sour-cherries- or red-currant-small-pies.

Take cinnamon, ginger, sugar, and some flour and when it is baked, sprinkle thereon cinnamon and sugar.


251. How to make a cornelian-cherry-pasty.

Take ginger, flours, cinnamon, butter, and dough that is good.


252. How to make a gooseberry-, strawberry- or crowberry- small-pies.

Take ginger, sugar, and some flour and when it is baked, sprinkle thereon cinnamon and sugar.


253. How to make a quail-pasty.

Take ginger, plums, currants, cinnamon, salt, sugar, and bone-marrow if you want or butter refreshed with verjuice.


254. How to make a "Sigot" [name of pasty] pasty.

Take pepper, cloves, mace, nutmeg, ginger, whole cloves, currants, plums, dates, bay laurel leaves, rosemary, coarse chopped in white dough or as it pleases you, refreshed with verjuice.


255. How to make a carp-pasty with sauce.

Take ginger, cloves, mace or nutmeg, currants, sugar, butter, and salt and when it is half baked, pour this sauce therein, made with wine-vinegar and roasted bread.


256. How to make "Flaso" [yeast dough egg cakes].

Make good dough from egg yolks, some yeast, and butter. Make dough very soft. When it is risen a bit, stick it in the oven. When it is baked, cut with small-slices and put thereon much sugar, cinnamon, and butter.


257. To make a warm rabbit-pasty.

Take ginger, rosemary, bay laurel leaves chopped, sugar, lemons, butter, refreshed with verjuice.


258. How to make a tongue and cow-feet-pasty.

Chop very small with suet and bone-marrow and take currants, cinnamon, ginger, sugar, and salt, verjuice, and butter, refreshed with wine or verjuice.


259. How to make a "Sigot" [name of pasty] pasty.

Take suet, bacon, rosemary, bay laurel leaves chopped and laid in the bottom and the flesh thereon. Then ginger, pepper, cloves, lemons, salt, sugar, currants, butter. When it is almost enough, then verjuice poured therein or in white dough.


260. To make a bone-marrow-pie.

Take bone-marrow, currants, ginger, cinnamon, sugar, and some flour and when it is baked, sugar thereon.


261. To make an apple-pancake.

261a Take a boiler of apples, one and a half pepper-cake, two jars of water, ginger, pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and thus mix as you put a jar of milk therein, so add thus continually fourteen eggs and thus mix a jar of water, as much of nutmeg, syrup, and eggs.

261b In another manner. Take apples, then boil with pepper-cake and when it is soft, take pepper and cloves, mace, ginger, syrup, sugar, many eggs, and butter.


262. How to make a warm pike-pasty.

Take rosemary, bay laurel leaves, salt, ginger, butter, currants, some sugar, refreshed with verjuice or stuffed just as for a capon with plums and lemons.


263. How to make a dove-small-pasty.

Take bacon, small-wine-berries, ginger, sugar, salt, butter, refreshed verjuice or stuffed with egg yolks with rose-water and bone-marrow.


264. How to make a Bourbonnais paste.

Take flour, saffron, and 24 eggs in the stoup and a half pound of butter.


265. How to make broth for a capon or wether-thigh.

Take the udder [>thigh?] or capon, put on the fire with clean water and some salt, skim it clean and when it is boiled half enough, thus cut it apart and lay a small-crumbs of white-bread to soak in the same broth. Put through a sieve and then put with the other broth and put therewith some verjuice with some ginger-powder, some saffron, and a sprig of rosemary. Lay herein the udder [>thigh?] or capon and leave thus to stew additionally together until it is enough with an unreduced broth. Dress it on and serve to the tables. Sprinkle thereon ginger-powder.


266. How one shall stew a capon or chicken.

Take half of the same broth in which the capon was boiled very tender and half [as much] wine, a good slice of butter, ginger-powder, and whole mace. Lay herein the capon and leave it together to boil until it is enough. Then dress it on and sprinkle thereover ginger-powder. If you wish to have the broth yellow, so add saffron and if you wish to have it sweet, so put therewith sugar. If you wish the broth to have thickness, so lay a crumb of white-bread to soak in the same broth that the capon is boiled in and put through a sieve. Leave also with the other to stew or if you wish to have it brown, thus add cinnamon-powder and clove-powder.


267. How to stew a chicken with lettuce.

Take half of the same broth in which the chicken were boiled very tender and some Rhenish wine, or take all of the same broth and verjuice, until you have it all, with a good slice of butter, with ginger-powder, and whole mace. Leave this in the steam bowls and then lay therein the chicken and then leave to stew until it is almost enough. Boil the lettuce very soft and then pour it in a colander and remove with water very stiff. If you wish, you might cut some into pieces on a cutting-board or leave whole and put with the chicken. Leave thus with to stew a bit so that the lettuce does not become weak. And as you dress on, thus sprinkle thereon ginger-powder.


268. How to stew a chicken or capon in the Walloon manner.

When the chicken is clean-washed, so fill with plums, raisins, and a piece of pepper-cake. Put this over the fire with clean water, salt it appropriately, skim it clean and leave to boil until it is enough. Then cut apart. Take some of the broth some fat and a good slice of butter. Put it in a pot and put therewith pepper, ginger, cloves, mace all powdered, of each some, and lay the chicken herein and leave therein to braise until it is enough, however leave the filling always in the chicken. Dress it on and sprinkle thereon what you wish. Thereafter serve.


269. This broth is on a boiled hen or capon.

While that the hen or capon boils, thus take wether-broth, put therein a quarter-part [of a pound] of currants, mace, and some pepper half broken, and much sugar. Leave this together in a small-pot to boil alone and when you think that it is enough, so take an egg yolk and beat it very small with verjuice and some wether-broth. Put it with the carrots [?] and take a half pound of plums, boil it alone in a small-pan with water and as the plums are boiled enough, so pour it through a colander and leave the water to drain out very completely. Then take a white-bread, cut thereof sops, lay in a dish and lay the hen or capon all hot out of the pot onto the sops in the dish. Then pour your sauce and the plums thereon and sprinkle thereon cinnamon-powder and sugar.


270. How to stew cauliflowers.

Take wether-broth that is very clear and wether-fat or butter, if you have no fat, and as this boils, so cut your cabbages in as large pieces as you wish and put in the pot with the wether-broth and ginger-powder and leave so to stew uncovered, because it should remain white. When it is enough, so dress in the dish and sprinkle thereon ginger-powder.


271. How to stew Savoy cabbages.

Take of the best closed Savoy cabbages. When it is clean-washed, thus squeeze the water well out and then pull the closed [leaves] open and stick therein bone-marrow and much currants and some ginger-powder, then close it closed again, the best that you can. Then lay in a pot with wether-broth and add ginger-powder. Leave thus to stand to stew until it is enough. Dress on and serve to the table.


272. How to make blanc-manger or white broth of a boiled capon.

Boil the capon until tender in Rhenish wine or in verjuice and clean water without stewing and then take a pound of almonds, remove the skins and crush very small, just as for a small-custard. Then put therewith some wheat-flour and then rub together through a sieve with Rhenish wine. Then put it in a small-pot and put therewith sugar, ginger-powder, a bit of salt, and some rose-water, so that it is as you want. Leave together a bit to boil, however it should be thick and then take the capon all boiling hot out of the pot and lay it hot in the dish. Pour thereon the broth all hot and serve it thus hot.


273. This is how to make [=do] some good when one does not have a good appetite.

Take [approximately 1 gram -- in this context probably means instead a pennyworth] of white-bread, grate completely. Take thereto six egg yolks, and a half rummer of rose-water, much sugar, until you think that it is sweet enough. Stir this in the butter just as one stirs eggs, however you should leave it to become harder. Then put it in a dish and sprinkle thereover sugar and cinnamon. This one eats with the spoon.


274. How to make some broiled flesh for invalids.

Take cold broiled wether-flesh, chop with the knife, just as when one eats with elderflower-vinegar or just as one makes a salad of salted flesh. Put this chopped flesh in a dish and therewith boiled capers, some butter and some verjuice and a bit of ginger-powder. Leave this together in a coffer to boil a while and then give it to the invalids to eat. If you wish to have it a bit sweet, so put therewith some sugar. Herewith you might also put onion and stew it so. Also for healthy people, when they do not have a good appetite.


275. To make a carp-pasty.

Take a carp, remove the scales completely, remove the intestine. Cut the head off and remove the interior fish-bone. Wash the carp clean and chop it thus raw very small. Then take some wine and verjuice and a little clean water. Put this in a pot to stew together and put therewith clove-powder, nutmeg-powder, ginger-powder, and sugar. Leave this to stew [until] very reduced. Then dress it on. It is ready.


276. How to stew a carp with blood.

Take half wine, half water, and butter. Leave this together to boil. Then add the carp, ginger-powder, and clove-powder. Leave this together to stew until it is enough. Make as reduced and [>or] unreduced as you wish and serve.


277. A sauce over a boiled pike.

Take melted butter and a white-bread hard roasted in this butter. Then take wine and a little vinegar, some whole pepper, ginger sliced in round pieces, and sugar, until you think that it is sweet enough. Leave this together to boil until it is enough. Then pour over the pike and dress it on.


278. How to make a capon-pasty in the Spanish [manner].

278a Take a raw capon without boiling, cut it into small pieces and lay it in your pasty. Then take ginger-powder, cinnamon-powder, a bit of mace, sugar, and a bit of salt, and bone-marrow of oxen or plates of butter. Then lay that on top with pieces [of the capon] and a bit of currants if you wish and then cover it closed with a Spanish cover or something otherwise. Thereafter leave to bake well.

278b How to make the sauce: take rose-water and a bit of sweet wine, two egg yolks, thereafter you will make it very [?] and [add] some sugar. Leave that together to boil until it thickens a bit. Pour also in your small-pasties and leave therewith to stand a bit in the oven. Then grate thereon some sugar and serve. This sauce one might make on cold capons and wild-hens. Take however sweet wine, rose-water, and sugar.


279. How to make a good venison-pasty, when no venison is obtainable.

279a Take beef-flesh from the buttocks or wether-flesh and chop it all raw very small. Then put therewith some salt, ginger-powder, pepper-powder, cloves, nutmeg, and mace all powdered, of each an even amount. Mix well together with the chopped flesh. Lay your chopped flesh in layers on a board, as large as you have your pasty if you wish and between each layer lay lard-bacon sliced in long thin pieces, just as one lards venison. Additionally lay between each layer flesh protracted as long as your pasty is and lay additionally as many layers until you think that your pasty is large enough. Thereafter wrap this flesh very softly in a clean linen cloth, so that it does not go [=escape] or first lay the cloth on the board. Thereafter put in a boiler beef-broth or wether-broth that does not have salt and put therein much vinegar and leave to boil. Then put the cloth with the chopped flesh in to stiffen, however leave in a small-boiler to boil or otherwise the bacon would melt too much. When you have no broth of [venison], so take water and vinegar. Then remove it and leave to become cold and lay in brown dough, however sprinkle under and above the flesh some herbs. Then it is ready. This same you might do with a wether-thigh, however you should push the flesh again on the bones, that this again seems to be a wether-thigh.

279b This is how to make the sauce. Take old-baked white-bread and cut in round slices, as much as you think that [you need to have] enough. Let roast brown until the crusts burn. Then throw in cold water, so will the burnt crusts go off. Then take red wine and one part of vinegar and leave the roasted bread therein to stand to soak at the fire, however [ensure that] it does not boil, otherwise it would become too custard-like. Then put it together through a sieve and put therewith the broth from the pasty, however it should be poured-out warm. Then you should remove the fat, as completely as you can and stir well together without the fat, because it should be poured cold. Then sample if it is spiced enough and add sugar to expel the large sourness. Then put in a pot and leave to boil, however watch that it does not become too thick and then pour again in your pasty with a funnel, until you think that it is enough. Leave therewith to stand to bake and serve.


280. How to bake a wether-thigh in the Lombardy [manner].

Take the wether-thigh, chop the flesh and the suet as above, however with dry marjoram, rosemary, ginger, nutmeg, pepper, mace, and cloves all powdered and some whole cloves, of each as much as you think good, currants, plums, verjuice, sweet wine, some sugar, and a bit of salt. Then put your flesh in the pasty of fine dough and sprinkle thereon your mixed suet, with some bay laurel leaves and leave so to bake. It brings its own sauce with as above. Serve warm.


281. How to make pies that one calls marzipan in the Spanish.

Take a pound of almonds peeled clean in lukewarm water and then dry it off, then pound in a mortar very small just as other [almonds] were ground and put therewith in the mortar now and then a bit of rose-water so that it does not become like oil. Then take fine Canary-sugar small-crushed, put therewith a bit of rose-water so that your sugar is properly melted or liquid and then put therewith additionally your crushed almonds. Stir well together and put it together in a boiler-pan and leave to bake a bit, however you should always stir so that it does not burn. Then take large host wafers, three in the round and one in the middle, then take your paste out of the pan and lay on the host wafers and make flat and round just as for a pie. If you wish, you might take an egg white and some rose-water and beat them together. Thereafter take a dry brush and rub your marzipan therewith, however I should preferably take sugar and rose-water and do just like the following marzipan and then set in a cool oven and leave to stand to dry until it glitters above. Then pull it out of the oven and sprinkle thereover nutmeg, stick therein long sugar and rosemary-small-sprigs. Stuff it as beautiful as you wish and serve cold to the table.


Nota: Take for three quarter-parts of almonds six ounces of fine sugar and the almonds one should crush a bit. The sugar-bakers put also a bit of clean flour in the almond-dough when working it together.


282. How to clarify sugar and to make syrup.

For a pound or one and a half pounds of sugar, take the white of a egg and a pint of water or thereabouts. Beat this water and white of the egg together well, with a twig made out of a broom-plant just like a switch so that it almost does not produce-foam/scum, the twig above sliced-off a bit equally and as this is thus beaten together, so add the sugar and leave together a bit to boil. Then pour through a sieve that is not loose and watch that it does not drip through in a stream. Then boil your syrup additionally until perfect. When your syrup begins to heave in the boiler, thus might you keep an eye on that. Take a saucer with a tin spoon and scoop there continually a spoon full into the small-saucer out of the boiler and leave therein to become cold and watch that it is thick enough. And when it is thick enough, thus stream equally thick oil when it is coldish and as you take two, three, four, or five pounds of sugar, thus take the white of two eggs and a good jar of well-water or thereabout and do additionally as it is suggested.


For all preserves you might well take "geresen" [?] Canary without expressly [being] told, fine Canary-sugar.


283. How to preserve red sour-cherries with the peels.

Take the best sugar that there is and clarify so that the syrup is all clear and when it is almost boiled, then pour therein the sour-cherries and leave with to boil a small bit until you have enough and leave thus to become cold. Thereafter put in a clean glass and stop it fast closed and set aside. For all conserves take now sometimes as much fine Canary-sugar as herbs, flour or carrots, to wit: for a half pound of flour, herbs or carrots, a pound of sugar, however there are some [persons] [who think] this is slippery [?]. There one takes however for the same weight [of flour, herbs or carrots], to wit: as much sugar as otherwise [=same weight of sugar as of flour, herbs or carrots].


284. How to preserve elecampane-root.

Take elecampane-roots, when they come fresh out of the earth, wash, scrape clean and cut them as large and small as you want. Then boil them soft, just as one should boil long turnips. Then pour it out and leave to lie to drain until you think that it is enough. Then make your syrup until it is perfect and when it is thick enough, so throw therein the elecampane-root and leave it in to boil until the moistness is again boiled-away. Skim it clean, leave to stand to become cool. Then put it in a pot and set it there with what you wish.


285. How to preserve elecampane-root dry.

Boil first your roots. Then leave a good half day or a night to drain or until you think that it is drained enough. Then take good white Canary-sugar and crush it to powder. Then take as much clean water and mix your sugar therewith until it is dissolved. Stir just as for a thick custard and leave your sugar to boil until the water is boiled-away. When the sugar begins to bake in the pan, as the water is boiled-away then throw therein your roots. Leave now with the sugar to boil a bit until the moistness of the roots is boiled-away, however you should always stir over the fire and off the fire until the sugar is baked all hard on the roots. Then it is perfect. This you might make not in a boiler, but in a pan, made boiler-wise with a long handle to take quickly from the fire and set thereon again.


286. How to make almond-butter.

Take a stoup of sweet-milk and make until hot on the "seu" [?]. Then add a pint of butter-milk and take immediately off. Thereafter take a clean cloth, pour therethrough, with the cloth wring the whey clean out. Pound the "matten" very small in a mortar. Then take of the best Canary-sugar, grate and put therewith as much as you think good and take a half pound of unsalted butter unmelted, how [>and] [approximately 1 gram] of rose-water. Put it all together in the mortar, pound well together and then dress it in small-dishes. It is as it befits.


Nota: All preserves you ought to prepare in boilers or boiler-pans.


287. How to make succade of all fruits, also of lemons that have lain in the souse.

Your fruits that you wish to preserve, you should salt them in a small-barrel and leave thus to lie 14 days or three weeks. Then leave five or six days to soak and once open wide all day. Then boil in clean water, however not too flat and when it is enough, so put immediately in the cold water until it is cold enough and then leave to lie to drain a half day until you think that it is drained enough. Then put in a small-barrel or "gheleyerschen" [?] pot and clarify your sugar with egg white, however you should take of the finest Canary-sugar and leave your syrup to boil stiffish. Then pour it on your fruits and then cover closed tight. Leave thus to stand four or five days. Then when it is again become thin, then thus re-boil it now once. You might re-boil the syrup, thus continually when it was watery. Then leave so to stand three, four or five months on dry plates, until the syrup is well saturated. When it has stood a long time until the time that you think they are saturated enough, then thus lay your fruits out of the syrup to drain. Take warm water and take each piece separately and wash thereoff the syrup. Then dry it or leave to lie to become dry as you think best. Thereafter boil your syrup wholly stiff so that the sugar begins to become white. Then stick therein each piece of your fruits separately and pull it out again immediately. Then lay thus on a hurdle, each piece separately. Leave thus to lie to become stiff and as hard and stiff as is enough, thus lay it where you wish to have it. Thus might you also make myrobalans and lemons that you take out of the souse, however this you might not then salt when you take it out of the souse. Thus lay to soak three or four days long and "hersopse" [?] all day. Then do additionally as above. The nutmegs one preserves also as the above narration stands.


288. How to make turnsole.

Take old linen-cloth and take juice of mulberries and stick the linen-cloth therein. Then leave in the sun to dry and stick it in thus for three or four passes. Then leave so each pass to dry, until you think that it is red enough. Thus might you make it of the red roses or red cauliflower that wash in the "coren" [?] and this keep also for the best when dried out of the sun; thus it keeps best its colour.


289. How to make succade.

Take squashes and gourds, peel and cut them in as large pieces as you wish. Salt it and leave so to lie close-covered three weeks or fourteen days in a small-barrel or "geleyerschen" [?] pot. Then set to soak in clean cold water, five or six days long. Give it twice every day fresh clean water and then boil it in clear water. When it is cooked, so put immediately in cold water. Leave therein to become cold and then lay to drain about a half day or until it is enough. Then take fine clean Canary-sugar, powder it and then take some clean water and make of the sugar a thick small-custard such that the sugar is properly dissolved. When your sugar begins to boil, so add your squashes or your gourds and leave thus in your sugar a good half hour to boil or until you think that it is hard enough. Then take a hurdle, lay each pieces separately thereon and leave thus to lie to stiffen or to become cold. Thus it is ready and lay it additionally thus dry aside in a small-barrel.


290. How to make Hippocras that is excellent.

Take three jars of Rhenish wine, two ounces of cinnamon, 2 drams of ginger, galingale, long pepper, and whole-cloves, of each a dram, a half pound of fine clean Canary-sugar. This should be half broken all together and set it together in the wine to soak a day or a night. Then pour together into a Hippocras-sack and leave so to stream continually through until you think that it is clear enough. If you wish to have red Hippocras, so take turnsole and leave that to soak in a small-drinking-vessel with Rhenish wine. Then put therein three or four times until it is red enough. Then put it with the other wine and leave together to soak. Then do as above. It is perfect.


291. How to make some potpourri that one lays in the linen-cloth.

Take red roses and dry them and when they are dried, so rub very small and add clove-powder, cinnamon-powder, and nutmeg-powder. Put it all together in a small-sack and lay there what you wish.


292. How to make a barley-small-custard for invalid people.

Take a small-spoon or two of barley-meal, temper it just like another barley-custard is tempered with half beer and half wine. Or if the wine is too strong, then take beer alone and temper it as thick or as thin as you want it. Thereafter add a bit of butter and as much sugar as you please. Leave this together to boil properly or if you wish to have it "lacxeert" [thick ? thin ?], thus add the sugar as it is boiled. If you wish, you might take verjuice instead of wine.


293. How to keep quinces good [for] a year.

Take your quinces fresh picked from the tree and take a small small-barrel. Put therein some lees of red wine. Then lay a layer of quinces and then again lees thereon and for each layer you should do thus, however especially the small-barrel should be very tight stopped and should stand on a board.


294. How to keep quinces and grapes good [for] a year.

Take clean sifted wood-ash and lay your quinces or grapes with layers and sprinkle between each layer the wood-ash very thick. So one keeps it good for a long time.


295. How to make a caudle for invalids that opens the nature and strengthens the members throughout.

Take an egg yolk small-beaten, and [add] thereto a small-bowl of warm wether-broth brought to the boil, thus [put] it with the flesh and boil. Put therein the beaten yolk all stirring. Then put therewith some nutmeg and mace and if you wish, so put therewith also some saffron. Thereafter put therewith some grated white-bread and leave this for the invalids to eat warm. This one also gives women in the child-bed.


296. How to make some drinks for invalid people that have laid long and taste no drink.

Take a fresh clean egg yolk and lay it in some clean well-water to pull the fieriness out. Then put the yolk in a silver cruse and beat it very small. Add a cruse full of wine with a bit of cold boiled well-water and some sugar. Then give it to the invalids to drink.


297. How to make a caudle for invalids who are strong from the wine-caudles.

Take a clean fresh egg yolk. Lay it for a bit in clean fresh well-water to pull the fieriness [!] out. Then put the yolk in a clean pot and beat small with verjuice and a rummer of Rhenish wine and some cold well-water, boiled with cinnamon. Leave together to boil in a small-boiler and then dress it on. Add pearl-sugar or other sugar until [there is enough to] make the invalids endure and serve. Then some [persons] do not take verjuice and water with the yolk and throw in a pipkin of cinnamon; who has no cinnamon-water and boil thus.


298. To make a drink for invalids who have a bad cough and can loosen no phlegm.

Take a jar of rain-water and a half firkin of Rhenish wine, vinegar, and three firkins of clean white maiden-honey. Thereafter leave this all together to boil and skim it off clean and boil it as long in a clean new earthen pot. At the time that it does not foam/scum any more, then take from the fire and leave to stream wholly clear through a sieve. Thereafter set it in a clean stone pot very tight close-covered and leave for the invalids in the the sober mornings a small-rummer hereof made lukewarm to drink and two hours thereon to fast. In the evenings for the meal do it just the same. This does loosen the tough phlegm and is often tried.


End of the cookbook.



 

 


    The initial rough translation into English, based on Marleen Willebrands' transcription, is copyright © 2003 by James Prescott. Some minor improvements, incorporated into this version, are copyright © 2019 James Prescott. There is one very specific exemption to my assertion of copyright. In 2003 I gave my rough translation to Jennifer Strobel for her to use as the basis for an improved translation, of which she said "... my plan was to publish it over the internet ...". This has not yet been done, except for fourteen selected recipes, hence this release of my rough translation for people to access in the meantime. Jennifer Strobel was in 2003 given my explicit permission to claim copyright for her improved translation. My claim of copyright for this rough translation shall in no way and at no time be interpreted as contesting or invalidating Jennifer Strobel's right to claim her own copyright for her derivative translation or translations. This translation will be taken down if and when Jennifer Strobel makes her improved version of the entire cookbook available online.


    Fourteen of Jennifer's improved translations were put up on "Gode Cookery" in 2004, and can be found as a doc file here (opens new window and downloads the file). I have not compared her improved translations with my rough ones.


 

 

 

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